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Chariots

Posted by despertaferro on 11 May 2009, 00:20

Biblical Period. The glossy :cry: appearance is the consecuence of enamel colors and a very soft plastic figures. :? I tried to minimize this effect painting the figures with an acrylic base first and then with enamels. Does not make any difference :(

Mitannian Chariot

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Hittite Chariots

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Posted by ColeF on 11 May 2009, 00:35

It doesn't look glossy to me, just wonderful! :thumbup: :love:
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ColeF  United States of America
 
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Posted by despertaferro on 11 May 2009, 07:10

Cole, you're the best supporter ever! :-D
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Posted by Paul on 11 May 2009, 17:20

A bit glossy maybe, and the reins are missing, they would have added a final touch toa nice set of chariots :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Posted by Peter on 11 May 2009, 18:25

Indeed a bit glossy, but for me well painted figures :thumbup:

Greetings Peter
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Martin on 11 May 2009, 21:58

Hi,
Anyway: the figs are painted very good. That is my opinion!
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Posted by Poniatowski on 11 May 2009, 22:38

for me they are to glossy but good painted. I suppose that on the base is sand, is it possible to ride chariot on sand? ;)
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Poniatowski  Poland
 
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Posted by Martin on 11 May 2009, 22:40

Hi Poniatowski,
The Egyptians had chariots too.
And Egypt is covered with sand so............
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Posted by despertaferro on 11 May 2009, 22:48

Good point Poniatowski :-)
To drive a chariot is hard in almost any ground. As far I know, ancient chariot battles were fought in prearrenged grounds.
At Gaugamela, the Persians had to prepare the battle field in order to make the scited chariot charge possible.
Things were very slow in ancient times... :-D
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Posted by Poniatowski on 12 May 2009, 15:50

I've noticed it, because I've made the same thing. Ive made war elephants, and when my friends saw them he asked if its possible that elephants
walk and fight on sand? ;)
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Poniatowski  Poland
 
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Posted by despertaferro on 12 May 2009, 17:05

They can walk for sure. Some groups of elephants live in Kalahari (I have seen a documentary about). And the elephants used by Anibal were from a different stock than modern elephants. They were smaller than african elephants and original from Nord Africa. So, probably they were able to live in dry and dessertic environement.
I would like to see your elephants... ;-)
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Posted by Paul on 12 May 2009, 17:53

There´s lots of different types of sand, apparently the sand in Egypt etc is not very good for buildingwork, but basically I agree with despertaferro, the ground would have to be stable, sandy maybe, but stable
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Posted by Phalanx on 13 May 2009, 21:13

sorry, but these figs are too glossy....

and there are no shadings at all----

some painters here are using 4 to 5 washings for one fig......

but these figs aren`t good washad and shadet.....



that`s my oppinion....

don`t worry my friend its my oppinion...



phalanx..


p.s. look at brushpunk ore michel for example...
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Posted by despertaferro on 13 May 2009, 21:45

You're right in everything, Phalanx.

I'm not trying to give anybody lessons, I'm just showing what I do. Sometimes right, sometimes wrong. That's how this forum works, I think. I did'nt read at any place "only wonderfully painted figures allowed".

Not only flattering opinions are welcome, but any opinion works for me. And thank you for saying what you honestly think about mi post.

The glossy aspect (that I do'nt like) is by accident. I found that very soft plastic figures reacts with enamels solvent and becomes glossy and sticky. I painted this figures following the same process that I use with the others I'd made. There is a problem for wich I did not found solution yet. Maybe I should cahnge to acrylics :-)
In the other hand, I'm aiming to a "mass" production. I like to make armies rather than individuals and I do'nt want to expend to much time in every subject. You're absolutelly right, chariots looks better with bridles. But that means to devote to much time in every chariot. In the pictures, a chariot without reins maybe maybe not nice. In a 150 figures army, belive me, you do'nt see the difference.

And I will check carefully those examples of beautiful chariots you point to me!

Many thanks :thumbup:
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Posted by ModernKiwi on 13 May 2009, 23:22

Hey despertaferro. I agree with you on the difficulties with the plastic used by Caesar (and Pegasus). It doesn't like thinners very much at all. And once the plastic is sticky, it doesn't seem to like washes very much either.
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Posted by Fenton on 14 May 2009, 00:05

Hi

Have you tried spraying the figs with testors dullcote?

This gives a very matt finish, I use it with army painter and it kills the glossy finish completly

Nice Chariots by the way....Just got one more Egyptian chariot to finish myself ( they seem to have taken ages)
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Posted by despertaferro on 14 May 2009, 08:06

Hi Fenton
I'll try to find this product and make a test. Thank you very much!
The figures are not just glossy, but also sticky, like not completly dry. And the funny thing is that they look perfectly dull and dry when were finished. They turn like that after a feww days :think:
My theory is that is the plastic inside wich is slightly melted at the surface level and, because it is sealed by the barnish coat and not in contact with the air, does not dry. But I'm not a scientist, so I'm not sure about.
If you drop a soft plastic figure inside a pot with enamel thinner you'll see what happen to it... :-D

ModernKiwi, you're right. Even if you wait until a coat is completly dry, next coat will soft everything up again :(
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Posted by despertaferro on 14 May 2009, 10:43

Hi all, I'll try to bring more light to this glossy/sticky matter.

All those figures are from my hittite army. All of them painted in exactly the same way, at the same time. Four different manufacturers, Atlantic, Esci, Hat and Caesar. All figures are of good, nicely designed and produced. The only difference bettwen them is the plastic quality.

I hope that helps to clear everything up.

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Posted by Paul on 14 May 2009, 17:51

It is the plastic!! I thought it was just me, when I paint any manufacturers figs I stick to my style, good or bad, irrespective of the plastics colour, gummi , hard or whatever type of plastic and I´ve noticed, particually with strelets figures, the result don´t match my other efforts. also metal figs end up with a different end result. Always assumed, one base coat and away I go, now I´ll have to rethink.
Thanks despertaferro for posting the last pics as an example :thumbup:
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Posted by Martin on 15 May 2009, 22:20

Hi despertaferro,
The skintone of the figs seems very good to me.
Good paintwork!
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