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Mont St Jean Farmhouse

Posted by Captain Sibourne on 03 Oct 2023, 15:32

Aha! You obviously missed this story: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech ... LISER.html
Captain Sibourne  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Bessiere on 04 Oct 2023, 04:52

These men were literal salt of the Earth. It's what they do with leftover bones from slaughterhouses and people were very poor back then.
Cheers,
Bessiere
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Posted by Minuteman on 04 Oct 2023, 20:33

Captain Sibourne wrote:Aha! You obviously missed this story: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech ... LISER.html


Thank you, I had missed this article and it makes for interesting reading!

Somehow the thought of digging up and grinding up the bones of the heroic fallen is somewhat distasteful, but then we have to realise that this is looking at things through 'modern day' conditioning. The archaeological record is often revealing of the hard fact that the lives that our predecessors and ancestors lived was often tough and sometimes relatively short; it was also one in which resources in many shapes of forms - including severed limbs for goodness sake - were of value and had to be recycled.

A lesson from history which will, at the very least, surprise some modern-day re-recyclers, perhaps?
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Minuteman  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Captain Sibourne on 05 Oct 2023, 15:25

I have some healthy scepticism about the human aspect of this story: the average weight of a male skeleton is apparently only 3kg - so I don't think the value lies in human remains. A horse skeleton is a lot heavier at 160kg - if 10,000 horses died at Waterloo, that might be worth digging up. The question is whether they were buried together.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 05 Oct 2023, 16:58

Do not forget about the ‘Waterloo teeth’.

It sounds callous today, but a good set of someone else’s teeth was worth a great deal.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by Bessiere on 05 Oct 2023, 17:04

Even were one motivated to match the amputated limbs with their owners such would be an impossible task. You make a good point about the horse skeleton having more value but anything of value back then would be converted to something usable if possible. I see no ethical issues arising though today I'm sure someone would.
Cheers,
Bessiere
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Posted by Captain Sibourne on 05 Oct 2023, 17:18

Good points!
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Posted by Santi Pérez on 05 Oct 2023, 19:27

What an masterly model you have achieved, Captain Sibourne! My respects, sir. :thumbup:

Santi.
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Santi Pérez  Spain
 
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Posted by Captain Sibourne on 06 Oct 2023, 05:40

Thanks Santi!
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Posted by Captain Sibourne on 15 Oct 2023, 20:07

It has been a busy weekend at the Mont St Jean A&E with casualty numbers rising alarmingly. The figures are mostly by the highly talented Liam with others by me and Sully. The addition of some straw tends to blend things in nicely but I intend to mix the straw in a bit more with the mud to complete the effect. I'm generally pleased with the results. More can be found at my blog: http://generalpicton.blogspot.com

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Hope you like them!
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Posted by Bill Slavin on 15 Oct 2023, 20:54

Um, like…? I’m not sure like is the right word. Fascinated, maybe, repelled a bit. You really have captured the chaos and horrors of war in this gruesome farmyard.
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Bill Slavin  Canada

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Posted by Peter on 15 Oct 2023, 21:37

Looking very good so far! :thumbup:

Ok it looks gruesome but that's how it was. :(
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Captain Sibourne on 15 Oct 2023, 22:37

Many thanks Bill and Peter!
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Posted by k.b. on 15 Oct 2023, 23:39

Too gruesome for my liking to be absolutely honest! Of course I realise this ugly side is part and parcel of war but yours truly confines himself to collecting, assembling, painting and eventually playing with his toy soldiers. That’s enough for me!
Nonetheless, I respect your dedication to this amazing project.
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Posted by Bessiere on 16 Oct 2023, 00:04

I love it, it's excellent work, every element and emotion all happening in that little space. This will be a visual centerpiece on the diorama revealing the true cost of war. Great job gentlemen!
Cheers,
Bessiere
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Posted by C M Dodson on 16 Oct 2023, 08:46

Excellent progress Captain .

The volume of imaginative conversions is lovely and there now is a feel of the chaos and despair of the humanity present.

I was wondering if the amputations would look so healthy following the blood loss but it is a minor observation in the sweep of the hard work epitomised here.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by Captain Sibourne on 16 Oct 2023, 10:29

Many thanks all. There is a tendency in military modelling circles to glorify the depiction of war and nowhere is that truer than with Napoleonics. I think it's important to show the reality, however grisly, but I appreciate that it is quite strong stuff. As a personal criticism, I think the straw looks over-sized and needs blending in more. Chris, the limbs are done by Liam who is a veteran of 40 years service in the NHS.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 16 Oct 2023, 13:31

Hi Captain.

I was referring to pallor mortis which the good Liam has indeed alluded to himself on a previous post.

It’s not a criticism, it’s just an observation.

The overall effect of your work with its graphic images helps to amplify the madness of conflict.

With respect to the straw, Woodland scenics would be an excellent choice in my opinion.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by Captain Sibourne on 16 Oct 2023, 13:48

Thanks Chris!
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Posted by Bill Slavin on 16 Oct 2023, 13:54

I just wanted to be clear that I think your diorama project is absolutely marvellous and intended no criticism! :yeah:
I totally agree that anything less in that farmyard would be inaccurate, and that all the pageantry and colour of Napoleonic warfare we love to represent in our hobby was destined to end in amputated limbs and gore.
As always, I'm blown away by what you are creating.
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Bill Slavin  Canada

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