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Die Schlacht von Ligny 16th Juni 1815

Posted by Mr. Cryns on 23 Dec 2016, 15:54

M.C. Dodson you created some excellent scenes again.
My compliments for that.
My favorite scene is the one with Prussians kicking away an ignited bomb. Very scarcely seen in modeling. If seen at all. I recognize a scene like this from a great Borodino painting where French and Russians are involved in the moment.

I noticed you did a lot of digital brushwork before posting your pictures.
Well that is what I am doing too. And many others with us.
For me the fun is to do digital painting in a way it is not noticed by the spectators.
I do not have a proper photoshop program. I just use a basic paint program that came with my microsoft system.

Let me tell you one of the tools I use very much: its the transparent graphite pencil I use to blur cut&paste lines created in the softfocus area's of the picture. Its difficult to find these spots in your pictures because its almost perfect already. But I often still see some of it where soldiers shoes and cannon wheels touch the ground: there it looks like you pasted some extra grass or ground over it because the base was visible or the wheel might not have touched the ground properly. And it seems like you did it with sharp edge pasting since diffused edges will destroy the specific shape of the subjects.

The problem with these kind of spots are: the edges of the pasted fields are too sharp for the blurred area in the foreground or background of a picture. Expensive professional photoshop programs have special tools for this like 'magic stick'. I do it the old school way: when I have a field edge that must be blurred just a little bit, I zoom in to it as far as a can so I see massive pixels. Then I choose a pencil color that is more or less between both edging field colors. So normally its a kind of brown or beige color. But often its greens for vegetation with other vegetation. With my 'mouse' cursor or my drawing pad pen I draw this transparent colored pencil line and follow exactly the line that should be blurred. Just that one line, only once. If you do it twice or more often, the transperancy gets lost and you get a real clear line. After zooming out to normal size of the picture, this drawn line is not visible as a line anymore. It just looks like a blurred edge of two different fields. And the sharp line in an unfocussed area attracts no attention anymore.

I use this same technique also for artificial background: like the edge of a tree or a roof against a white or light blue sky field. Making it just a little diffuse and out of focus. Well, as long as you use that painted decor in the background of your diorama, you don't have that problem to solve.
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Mr. Cryns  Netherlands

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Posted by sansovino on 23 Dec 2016, 18:33

I like really your work and its perfect presentation with photos. You are a telling us the real history of one of the most forgotten ferious fights against Napoleon. I wasn´t only the allied army under Wellington which won at Waterloo.
I am still waiting on the very long announced set of Haets Landwehr to build the fights of the Prussians in and around Placenoit. Unfortunatly Haet postpone this set since 2010 and no other producer see the great selling potential to build a new Landwehr-set besides the existing and quite old Airfix box.
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Posted by Michael Robert on 23 Dec 2016, 21:29

Hello,
following your story, M Dodson, from the beginning. Very inspirational. I love everything - the many détails, conversions, the large panoramic views, the action, historical detail. It is truly a lesser known battle to Waterloo, but a very interesting one. Allies at that time shared the French fighting spirit. Every action and field battle is a close-run thing.

Your Learning curve is also visible. I am not able to give such detailed remarks and observations as Mr Cryns, but every time you progress and make me wait eagerly for the suite.

Merry Christmas to you :merrychristmas:

Michael
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Michael Robert  France

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Posted by C M Dodson on 24 Dec 2016, 17:26

Thank you to everyone for their kind comments.

The sharp eyed Mr Crynns is correct in that the idea for the burning shell scene came from the Borodino redoubt painting.

Digital photography is fantastic in that the only thing it costs is time. However even with prepared scenes it takes upwards of one hundred shots to get the best picture. With the introduction of theatrical smoke the variables such as focus, clarity etc can drive you slightly bonkers.

My IT skills are primarily limited to resizing, cropping and using the clone brush to cover up errors such as an errant base. Mr Crynns suggestions are interesting but I feel that they are a bit beyond my ability.

One scene that I found the copy tool useful was the fleeing Prussians. Whilst the fire was real, attempts to set fire to the troops themselves resulted in a molten pool of soldiers. By cutting and pasting I achieved a good effect to the very grateful troops involved.

Thank you again and a very Happy Christmas to everyone.
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 20 Feb 2017, 15:33

Die Schlacht Von Ligny 16th Juni 1815


Timeline 6.30 PM

The Prussian flank attack on St. Amand la Haie by the Prussian 5th Brigade, Generalmajor Ernst Ludwig von Tippelskirch has been repulsed by a spirited French defence. The cavalry action has spluttered out as both sides regroup.

Casualties are heavy and these troops have fallen back to the relative safety of Wagnelee. St. Amand la Haie is now controlled by the French.

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The initial French assault over the Ligne brook has been beaten back with many casualties. Artillery is being deployed on the common prior to a new arrack.

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Prussian re- inforcements consisting of elements from 6th Brigade, Generalmajor Karl August von Kraft support the defence of Ligny opposite the Chateau de Looz.

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1st Brigade, Colonel Baume from 14th Infantry Division, Marchel-de-la camp Baron Etinne Hulot are heavily engaged by the watermill attempting to take the stone bridge.

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His Majesty is concerned that the French as 1st Corps, General officer commanding Jean Baptiste Drout, Comte d’Erlon appears to have ‘vanished’ despite orders to attack Wagnelee. Treason?

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However, viewing the action from the Tombe de Ligny he judges that the time has come for the coup de grace. The ‘Beautiful Daughters’ are deployed and the Guard, commanding officer Lieutenant-general Antoine-Alexandre, Comte Drout begins its attack on Ligny.

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Vive L’Empereur!
Last edited by Paul on 10 Aug 2017, 19:04, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: pic links fixed
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Posted by sberry on 20 Feb 2017, 17:30

These pictures are excellent, like movie stills! The atmosphere, the composition - everything is great.
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Posted by Peter on 20 Feb 2017, 18:16

Yes it sure is! I'm Always pleased to see the next episode of this battle! Go on Chris! :thumbup:
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Posted by Emperor on 20 Feb 2017, 19:08

@C M Dodson- Yes Long live me! LOL :mrgreen:
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Posted by Thomas Mischak on 21 Feb 2017, 17:18

Hello Chris,

a very good work. Magnificent !!!

Greetings
Thomas
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Posted by stenfalk on 21 Feb 2017, 18:34

This is breathtaking. Close to reality down to the smallest detail. And also superbly photographed! :thumbup:
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Posted by Mr. Cryns on 22 Feb 2017, 12:18

Mr. Dodson,

Your image of the brook with casualties is as gruesome as it is marvelous. The effect of the still water in that brook, without any movement, reflecting the smokey skye, represents the silence of death.
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Mr. Cryns  Netherlands

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Posted by despertaferro on 22 Feb 2017, 13:49

Some beautiful movie stills there! :-D

:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Posted by C M Dodson on 25 Feb 2017, 20:31

Thank you to everyone for their kind comments and likes. Mr Cryns, ' The silence of death', sounds a bit scary to me!

The film stills is a good idea as the Feldmarschall has suggested doing a loop to music when the project is finished. We shall see.

In the meantime the action is approaching it's climax to the accompaniment of a thunderstorm. Will the guard sweep Blucher away or will the line hold until nightfall?

Thank you again to everyone for their support.

Chris
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Posted by Traveller1865 on 25 Feb 2017, 21:03

Fantastic, I wish I could do terrain like that..
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Traveller1865  Sweden
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 16 Apr 2017, 11:32

Die Schlacht Von Ligny 16th Juni 1815

Timeline 7.00PM


1st Division De La Jeune Garde, Lieutenant-general Philibert-Guillaume, Comte Duhesme assaults the Ligne brook at Ligny.

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1st Brigade, Colonel Baume from 14th Infantry Division, Marchel-de-la camp Baron Etinne Hulot are again heavily engaged by the watermill in a renewed attempt to take the stone bridge.

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The Prussian 9th Brigade, Generalmajor Karl August von Borcke from 111 Korps, led by Feldmarschall Blucher have started to arrive at the Bois du Loup adjacent to Ligny in order to reinforce the line.

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The Prussian right flank at Saint Armand Le Haye is starting to disintegrate as the 7th Infantry Division, Lieutenant-general Baron Jean-Baptiste Girard advances from the village towards Brye.

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Wellingtons promised ’assistance’ has failed to materialise and the Wagnelee garrison is withdrawing to the old Roman road, the Chaussee Brunehaut allowing access to Sombreffe where a union with 111 Korps is planned.

The Old Guard, under artillery fire from the Prussian reserve batteries positioned behind Ligny enters the village.

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The attack is supported by the Guard Heavy Cavalry Division Lieutenant-general Claude-Etienne, Comte Guyot and the cuirassiers of the 14th Cavalry Division Lieutenant-general Baron Jacques-Antoine Delort.

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His Majesty watches with satisfaction from the Tombe de Ligny as the Prussian position starts to collapse. ‘They are lost, they have no reserve remaining’ states the Emperor.

The approach of a thunderstorm adds to the drama as the field darkens for the last act.

La Victorie est a Nous, Vive la France, Avant!
Last edited by Paul on 10 Aug 2017, 19:05, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: pic links fixed
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Mr. Cryns on 17 Apr 2017, 11:25

Mr. Dodson,

Some great new impressions and compositions of this huge battle again.
You show us one of the limited moments the French Imperial Guards saw action during the Napoleonic wars. If they were fighting at all, it was at the end of a battle. Is that correct?
I always wonder: how could the guard be so superior while they were fighting so little?
I know they were composed by picking the best and bravest soldiers from the line regiments. But still: a man needs to practice its skills continuous, not to loose its profession after some time. Or do you have another vision on this?

The picture of your French field hospital is to be mentioned in particular: very realistic. Many people seen on the back but that only adds to the realism. Like a picture shot at that moment by a reporter. The light is dark but that adds to the atmosphere and also will fit the time of the day with the skye darkened by gunsmoke.

Great shot through the first floor window!

C M Dodson wrote:The approach of a thunderstorm adds to the drama as the field darkens for the last act.


Does this mean there will be another last additional post to this topic?
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Mr. Cryns  Netherlands

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Posted by deon on 17 Apr 2017, 18:53

I had to do a double take - I was sure those scenics were real with photoshopped soldiers :) Awesome work! An artist in miniature!
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Posted by Bill Slavin on 18 Apr 2017, 00:24

A beautiful new addition to this epic work! Mind-boggling as always.
Thank you.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 18 Apr 2017, 08:11

Thank you to everyone for their kind comments.

Mr Crynns raises interesting questions regarding the Guard.

David Chandler in the excellent ' Campaigns of Napoleon' states that the Guard were rarely employed until after 1813. Their role seems to have been not only a reserve but also a physiological threat to the enemy.

The principal of practising your skill set is also an interesting one. The Guard had the best of everything when available and no doubt practised accordingly.

Whilst draining the Line regiments of their best troops by promotion to the Guard, the combat experience of the these veterans would undoubtably been an asset to their allocated formations. When employed, usually to deliver the coup de grace, their combat performance was normally devastating. The problem is, with Napoleonic warfare especially, their numbers and with it their combat experience would diminish rapidly with use.

My phrase ' The last act' refers to the climax of the battle.

Blucher has lost, as von Clausewitz, who was there, eloquently explains was probably inevitable. The real question is how badly? The next moves will provide the answer.

Thank you again.

Chris
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Posted by Mr. Cryns on 18 Apr 2017, 09:31

Thanks for your explanation.

C M Dodson wrote: their combat performance was normally devastating.


I am not sure what you are saying here:
Was it devastating for their enemies?
Or was it devastating for themselves? (like at Waterloo and after crossing the Berezina river where the 3th Dutch Grenadiers were wiped out for ever?)
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Mr. Cryns  Netherlands

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