Tutorials

Working with cork

Posted by blockhaus on 22 May 2010, 13:16

I want show some use of the cork, mainly for making stones. I know that have another metods and materials for reproduce it, but this give soem unique textures.The sample is for a brick wall for 1/35 but changing a bit the measurements can be used for every scale

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from a set how cork we cut this i stripes. every stripe will have a ligth difference wide that previous
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we must construct a structure in carboard for apply the cork
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we will cut tyhe cork it little pieces...
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and glue them at the structure
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sand the excess of cork equalizing the suface. afther this action, we will obtain a old wall surface, with a very little "eye vibration" ( the surface will be plain but no as marbre stone)
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we will aply a coat of spackle
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afther retreat the ecesss of spackle (before dryes) you can obtain this
hope that this helps
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Posted by Dad's Army on 22 May 2010, 13:21

This is a nice article, but won't the cork be to small in 1/72?
My compliments on the result :thumbup:
(and a handy tool you got to cut it)
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Dad's Army  Netherlands

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Posted by blockhaus on 22 May 2010, 13:33

Hi,
yes is too small for brick, but not for reproduce stones.Hope that I show soon some work done with this metod
Carlos
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Posted by Paul on 22 May 2010, 14:06

Ok this isn´t the most scientific method in the world, a lot of variables like screen size etc but I´ve held a 1/72nd bod up to the screen showing the picture where the plaster is being applied and it seems to fit pretty well.

Good one :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Posted by Peter on 22 May 2010, 16:50

Good tutorial :thumbup:
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Martin on 22 May 2010, 23:24

Someone tried this already in 1:72?
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Martin  Netherlands
 
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Posted by Alois Nebel on 23 May 2010, 07:29

Nice tutorial. What about painting. Could add some informations about it?

V.
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Alois Nebel  Czech Republic
 
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Posted by Valion on 23 May 2010, 08:31

Thank you ! I'll give it a try as soon as I find such a thin layer of cork.
Paul, do they have it at the hobby store close to the Dortmund central station ? ;-)

Gruß,
Marc.
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Valion  Germany
 
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Posted by Paul on 23 May 2010, 09:15

Valion wrote:Paul, do they have it at the hobby store close to the Dortmund central station ? ;-)

Gruß,
Marc.

The one next to the museum? Yes, but they are bunch of stuck up arrogant unhelpfull grannies. The one on the Hellweg is better, 3 doors up from the Lutgenau toy shop. :-)
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Posted by Phersu on 23 May 2010, 14:35

Great tutorial and excellent natural material indeed! :love:
This bricks are one of the most clever ways to use it! :thumbup:

Cork is versatile and easy to work, it also have a much wider variety of types than commonly assumed.
Unfortunately it may be difficult to get the full range of cork available... :(
Just like the real rough bark from the trees have many different kinds, and that's cheap or free if you have a wood of such trees at hand... :mrgreen:

The common panels may already have a different thicknesses, I mean as texture not as depth in inches! :evil:
Panels are usually made from cork scratches glued together like in wooden chipboard.
Some brands use thicker and flatter textures (fine enough to draw and paint on it) and other are more rough and irregular (usually used for isolating panels).
Smaller panels also can be made of real sliced cork bark-tree, and they are different as there are different kinds of cork trees...

A curiosity about these amazing material: it's probably the most effective natural thermic isolating material.
Exposed to very high temperatures and flames it form a thin carbonized layer while keeping the rest underneath unaffected.
It's so effective that's used to protect the screw bolts of space crafts from the high temperatures caused by the impact with atmosphere in landings from from orbit. :shock:
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Posted by blockhaus on 24 May 2010, 17:11

Hello all, thanks for your atention.
Alois: I not have photos of the painted pieces in 1/72 , only at 1/35 But I supoose that the result are similar. Cork must be painted afther cover the pieces with a sealand layer with gesso or similar.

Phersu,really you know a lot about cork! I not know is the same in another palces but herein Barcelona is easy find cork sheets from 1mm to 10 mm thick extrafine particle
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Posted by Phersu on 25 May 2010, 12:50

blockhaus wrote:Phersu,really you know a lot about cork! I not know is the same in another palces but herein Barcelona is easy find cork sheets from 1mm to 10 mm thick extrafine particle


It's easy to become a cork fan from the childhood here in Tuscany, just finding nice cork-tree barks during a walk in the woods. :love:
Furthermore there's a diffused tradition of cork toys and gadgets too. :mrgreen:

Sardinia and Corse Islands are the main producers due the large diffusion of such trees.
But cork-tree woods are also quite common in the neighbour countries all around.

It can be used also naturally rough or just painted for diorama terrain, in large pieces to simulate rocky cliffs or in small pieces as single small rocks. :thumbup:

This isn't the best looking piece of raw bark I have, just the first that come out from my shed:
Image [/img]
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Phersu  Italy
 
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Posted by Nono on 25 May 2010, 16:42

Peter wrote:Good tutorial :thumbup:
+1 :thumbup:
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Nono  France
 
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Posted by Paul on 25 May 2010, 18:25

Phersu wrote:This isn't the best looking piece of raw bark I have, just the first that come out from my shed:

Ah!!! Quercus suber if I´m not mistaken, beautiful trees :love: :love:
You are lucky to live in such a great part of the world..the plants there :love: :love: The forests :love: :love:
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