Tutorials

Figure Sculpting in 1/72nd Scale

Posted by Phersu on 29 Apr 2010, 21:16

It's great to learn tricks and possible alternatives for similar tasks from so skillful masters! :thumbup:
Right tools and working method can help a lot, anyway it's a rare talent to sculpt so well such small features. :notworthy:
Despite I can't reach your levels, your works and tutorials are a great inspiration, the explanations and examples allowed me many improvements.

Before to know your works I use to be satisfied of much rougher results... :vomit:
Now I pay more attention and I dedicate much more work to new figures.
More care and attention to details, as well as corrections and improvements means much more time (for me anyway...) but it's worth. :thumbup:
I learned many tricks thank to your examples and hints.
I learned also to be less impatient to see a work finished... I'm not quick and I do less figures now, but they come out much better. :mrgreen:
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Posted by Frankzett on 29 Apr 2010, 23:18

Great pictures Alex,
it looks very different to my sculpting. I've much less patience to work with so much layers. May be it's the late medieval tight fashion of my 15th century Swiss soldiers - my heroes in tights :mrgreen: . And may be, when I do 11-12 figs simutaneuos (that means one centrifugal mould) I get nervy :drool: .
It's interesting to see that your wire skeleton has nearly no accentuation of the hip and the shoulders. For my sculpting I often need to have nearly the complete skeleton in end position to "feel" the pose of the figure.

Greetings
Frank
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Posted by je_touche on 30 Apr 2010, 09:31

Frankzett wrote:It's interesting to see that your wire skeleton has nearly no accentuation of the hip and the shoulders. For my sculpting I often need to have nearly the complete skeleton in end position to "feel" the pose of the figure.
Frank


Yes indeed, I think it depends on what you are sculpting. E.g., when sculpting a woman in a long skirt or dress in an upright pose, I sometimes don't need more than a pin with a blob of putty as a head on top. Those late medieval gowns lend themselves well for this sort of sculpting.
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Posted by KenzoSato on 30 Apr 2010, 10:21

Fantastic, very interesting
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Posted by west1871 on 30 Apr 2010, 10:26

Many,Many thanks for the tutorial :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:
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west1871  United Kingdom

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Posted by Alex on 30 Apr 2010, 15:42

:-D
My tools.
To simulate the figures I use smaller instruments than offer different manufacturers. To model the body and clothing better rubber tools. You can sculpt without worrying about anti-adhesive, no dampening water. To simulate a more clear boundaries - I use a metal tool, which produced independently. Its surface in contact with the plastic must be polished.
For fine detail person, I also apply a homemade rubber tool. (I will show it later)
Image
Image
:-D
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Alex  Russia
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Posted by Paul on 30 Apr 2010, 15:57

One question. Probably a stupid one but at what should the greenstuff (or whatever) be worked upon. ? Straight away, let it set a bit? How hard or soft does the material have to be, or is that a question of just gathering experience.?
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Posted by je_touche on 30 Apr 2010, 16:13

Interesting. I found those rubber shapers always a bit clumsy for smallscale work, but maybe the smallest sizes are just fine. I should give them a try.

Where did you get those handles to hold your self-made tools with?

@Paul, it depends what you are doing with the putty (whatever brand you are using). When you are spreading the putty over the figure to sculpt a garment, e.g., it should still be fairly soft. The important thing is to know how much you need of the putty (matter of experience), because it is somewhat difficult to remove or add to it afterwards - that's why I hardly ever use pure GS because it's pretty difficult to blend. After that, let it cure a bit, then start detailing the surface - folds, buttons, embellishments or whatever. Sharp edges can be formed better after the putty has set a bit, too.
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Posted by Alex on 30 Apr 2010, 18:56

- Rubber tool size "0" (zero) is quite suitable for our size. for the initial application to the plastic frame and the increase of body weight. But for modeling parts of the face also can be used. Handles made of bronze designed for clamping drill and have a chuck. I bought them in store for jewelers. The same but with 2 collets (from both ends of the handle) are available in many hobby-shop
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Posted by mathew@wartime on 24 Mar 2011, 23:13

Hey Guys

Just back reading after finally getting the chance to have a browse.

This is a great topic. I started sculpting about 12 months ago. I found the best way to start was on existing figures by doing conversions. conversions in the sense of arms, hands, redoing equipment etc. I have basically spent the 12 months concentrating on those aspects and only now found myself getting more proficient at it. I have now started doing helmets/head gear. Doing things in small stages lets me concentrate on one aspect to a point i am happy with before moving on. I do do beards etc, but am yet to try faces. But after reading this thread, i will certainly be having a go sooner rather than later.

as to tools, well i do not make mine, i use the clay sculpting set as Alex showed and just a basic sculpting set. I am not doing overly fine detail at this point, but will use finer tools as i develop.

The key for me is taking small steps, trying to sculpt a whole figure straight off can be frustrating, i tried it.

Below is some of the conversion work i have done. I actually produce my own figures (hence wartime). I will then rework some used masters or commissioned dollies to make the figures i want. These are wargaming figures, not specific modeling.

I commissioned a series of dollies for Vietnam period. had them cast and did my own adjustments from there. Some with sleeves down, some up, added a watch to figure 2nd from left on left arm. I have VC, NVA (early and late) and Australians still waiting for some attention. :)
Image

Here are some modern insurgents i reworked and or converted from some of my own castings.
Image

Here is a more recent work up adding a current model helmet to a modern Australian Master.
Image

My sculptor uses the "Brown Stuff", i used "Green Stuff" up until the last couple of weeks and now have been quite taken by procreate.

Anyway i hope this contributes. :)

regards
Mathew
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Posted by Sho on 05 Dec 2011, 03:00

My humble tries to sculpt 15mm..
Image
Image
Image
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Sho  Estonia
 
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Posted by Winttrix on 05 Dec 2011, 06:31

Those are excellent Sho :love: :love: You are far too modest, if I managed to do something half as well I would be strutting down the street :lol: :lol:
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Posted by dykio on 05 Dec 2011, 09:05

Aw man, i'm so jelous at you (sculpting) guys. Brilliant stuff :thumbup: :thumbup: :love:
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dykio  Netherlands
 
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Posted by SamSagace on 05 Dec 2011, 12:20

your sculpt (15mm !!!!!!!!!!) is absolutely fantastic! you can be proud of it! :thumbup: :thumbup:
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SamSagace  France
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Posted by Duke atreides on 05 Dec 2011, 16:13

:shock: :shock:
Come on!! You make it look so easy!
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Posted by MABO on 05 Dec 2011, 17:26

:headbang: Great job!!

:shock: :cheers:

What is it DAK?
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MABO  Germany
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Posted by Peter on 05 Dec 2011, 19:17

MABO wrote: What is it DAK?

It means Deutsches Afrikakorps ;-)
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Sho on 05 Dec 2011, 21:07

MABO wrote:What is it DAK?
Not exactly.. this must be Deutch GebirgsJägers or Wehrmacht with Feldmütze Sniperteam 1944-1955 by idea.

All bunch is here..
Image
15mm
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Sho  Estonia
 
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Posted by Dad's Army on 05 Dec 2011, 21:35

Respect on these, another artist..... :love:
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Posted by Paul on 05 Dec 2011, 22:11

Not my period but I like these, they have character... :thumbup: :thumbup:
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Paul  China

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