Work in Progress

The Battle of Aspern Essling 21/22nd May 1809

Posted by Captain Sibourne on 20 Apr 2024, 23:04

It's going to be great!
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Posted by Beano Boy on 21 Apr 2024, 07:40

:coffee: Wonderful, absolutely Wonderful. :thumbup: BB
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Posted by C M Dodson on 22 Apr 2024, 20:19

Essling ‘Schloss’ Essling.

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The oldest form of the place name, according to my research was Ezzelaren.[1] The Eslarn family had important roles in the Vienna city administration. Konrad von Eslarn was mayor of Vienna in 1287. From about 1590, the place name changed into Ehsling or Essling.

Michael’s excellent 1809 blog states that a farm was converted in 1378 to a fortification and was then developed, over time into the ‘ Schloss’. This impressive building with its stables and church on the road opposite was severely damaged during the action. Nevertheless, the building in its present form still occupies its position and now features a very nice restaurant.

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The 1820 map shows the extent of this edifice along the Main Street.

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Once again I am beholden to Thomas Brandsletter for his brilliant research on town houses. Essling seems to have been more municipal than Aspern with its buildings reflecting this.

This link is informative.

https://wargamingraft.wordpress.com/202 ... wn-houses/

In Austria, the 1780s saw the emergence of the so-called “Plattenstil” (panel style), with smooth, regular panels and a bright, single-coloured coat of paint – in Austria, but also in Bavaria often in a yellow ochre called “Schönbrunner Gelb” (or “Barockgelb”).

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I have therefore utilised this information, the battle print and the current structure to provide the basis of my building.

Whilst the original building has a top floor stretch of fourteen windows this would make a massive frontage. Essling, smaller than Aspern is about eighty centimetres long for my purposes and I wish to have dwellings/ barns etc as well as civic properties on the site. I have therefore reduced the length whilst hopefully still retaining the ‘feel’ of the place.

Having cut out the many windows I proceeded to attach the window features and using balsa constructed the panelling, primarily on the facade.

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The Baroque look seems to be, upon investigating the rear of the building via Google Earth, to be less decorated than the imposing frontage.

Lots to do.

Chris
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Posted by C M Dodson on 02 May 2024, 15:02

Part two.



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Having assembled the building, roof and chimneys I mixed up a suitable colour scheme as shown.

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I decided not to glaze the windows as I wish to be able to place troops inside in order that they can shoot outside. To this effect a floor was also placed inside the construction.

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The Essling coat of arms was taken off the net and reduced to size. I was originally going to mould it from Greenstuff but I thought the shield was attractive. The building has a clock now but, as per the Schuttkasten, the church would be the official time keeper for the village so the coat of arms it is.

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Lots to do.

Chris
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Posted by Peter on 03 May 2024, 16:35

Very nice building! :thumbup:
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Posted by C M Dodson on 15 May 2024, 09:32

Essling Church

Located opposite the ‘schloss’ on the Hauptstrasse is the Essling church.

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My research into the original structure was fairly fruitless.

Michael’s wonderful 1809 blog refers to a model at the Army museum but I could not find this. He built a lovely 10mm model which to my mind looks very medieval.

The seventeenth century saw a flurry of Baroque style building activity resulting in the Aspern church as an example.

The modern version, recently extended in 2013, gives very little clue as to the original structure. However, a picture taken in 1900 shows the church, looking very Baroque indeed. Whilst the church was damaged during the battle I felt that in the absence of firm evidence I would use this as a basis for my model.

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Balsa wood was again used for the construction with a Wills sheeting roof. A home made bell is in the tower. Once again I had had fun with the roof as I wanted it to be removable. However, the steeple’s positioning required it to be fixed.

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I also made a ‘Turkish’ style dome as I have a hankering at a river crossing scene with the Kaiser Ebersdorf church in the background. The steeple, poking out of the trees will be most useful.

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I wanted a nice clock for the building and after finding a suitable picture with Roman numerals, reduced and printed it to scale. I inked in the original hands to create a blank canvass so to speak. The new hands are picture wire and can be moved to the desired time.

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I am pleased with the finished result.

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Lots to do.

Chris
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Posted by Santi Pérez on 15 May 2024, 18:59

This Essling Church is a very nice addition to the buildings of your project, Chris. :love:

Santi.
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Posted by k.b. on 16 May 2024, 16:03

Fascinating stuff as always Mr D. Love to see your projects evolving until completion (unlike so many of my own).
In particular I love the clock and the lovely touch regarding the moveable hands which will definitely come in handy for your future storytelling regarding the battle.
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Posted by PaulRPetri on 17 May 2024, 01:08

Boy Chris that is some real top notch research and excellent craftsmanship on the excecution of those buildings!! WOW!!
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Posted by Ochoin on 17 May 2024, 10:06

I think most of us would regard research as an interesting & important part of the hobby.
Chris takes this to the next level.
How could you not be impressed?

donald
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Posted by Peter on 19 May 2024, 22:23

Very nice church, I love it! :thumbup:

PS: I fixed, how did you call it, senility? :-D
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Posted by Challenger77 on 11 Jun 2024, 15:53

Hello Chris !
Iam not really into Military Modelling but this Project is interessting. I live very close to the Schüttkasten Building :-D Nice to see what you do. In the "Schloss Essling" is a nice Restaurant today. If you need i can take actual Pictures of the Buildings here around.
Greetings from Vienna, Essling !
Harry
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Posted by C M Dodson on 12 Jun 2024, 09:31

Thank you.

What a kind offer.

Having ‘ my man in Essling’ is a real kudos earner!

My Google Earth searches have been very useful and the ‘main’ feature buildings are now complete.

I know the area has changed enormously but if you spot something of the period then it may be very useful indeed.

I am currently building brick kilns for the brickworks which are a little different.

Incidentally, I watched the Ferrari film recently which instantly made me think of your work.

Ps. How us my ‘wife’ getting on?

Best wishes and thank you again.

Chris
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Posted by Challenger77 on 12 Jun 2024, 14:34

Hi Chris,
i will take some pics and send it with PN.
Well on the MM dio is nothing new, still struggles with the Tiredesaster. I must remove the benz and the Alfa also, the Tires on this ones are getting also worse. But i fear that i broke something, this Cars are fragile......So your Wife looks a bit Angry :-D
But as you've seen the AVUS is complaete and was on "Vacation" in Italy. Verbano Model Show, but no Prize at at all, it was the only Model in the Special Contest..... :drool:
Regards
Harry
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Posted by C M Dodson on 12 Jun 2024, 16:34

Hi Harry.

That is extraordinary kind of you.

Your cars should be best of show in my opinion.

I wonder if you might know about this?

Many of the buildings of the villages that look original on a a Google Earth search seem to be length ways to the road as opposed to the gable end that Thomas describes in his wonderful reference work.

Is this correct or are they not the original buildings?

Or Is it a mix of both types of positioning to the street?

There doesn’t seem to be a clock on the original Aspern church and research suggests that the Granary sun dial is post the battle.

All help gratefully received .

Thank you again.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by Challenger77 on 13 Jun 2024, 06:45

hello Chris,
thank you , well my Diorama was the only Entrance in the Category, so they dont judge it. But i have funny Days.
To your Questions i have a Link with several Plans, that maybe help. Fotos show the Esslinger Hauptstrasse around 1900.
The Sun Dial is from after the Battle, dont know exactly when it was monted.
Here is a Link for the Schüttkasten itself and another for the Battle.
https://www.schüttkasten-essling.at/
https://battlefieldanomalies.com/napole ... and-znaim/
and i try to get the Maps from 1809 when the Vienna Internetsite is online again.
hope that helps
Kind Regards
Harry
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Posted by C M Dodson on 13 Jun 2024, 07:17

Thank you for the links and information Harry, you are very kind.

The views from the door of the a granary are really different.

The house at the back is length side on but I wonder if these are original structures?

Thomas’s research suggests the gable ends were facing the road rather than the length of the property.

My street maps show L shapes which could be either.

Fascinating stuff.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by Bessiere on 14 Jun 2024, 08:27

I love your buildings Mr D! Exactly the style I;d like on my game table. I also appreciate the depths you go to research so you can recreate as close as possible to the original item, in whatever form that may be. Your synthesis of modelling, gaming and history (and photography!) is unique and I for one, am always interested in learning more about your thoughts and methods as you do your projects. Its why this is such a great site as folks like yourself share information and inspiration. All in a close-knit community. Yeah!
Cheers,
Bessiere
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Posted by Challenger77 on 14 Jun 2024, 20:20

C M Dodson wrote:Thank you for the links and information Harry, you are very kind.

The views from the door of the a granary are really different.

The house at the back is length side on but I wonder if these are original structures?

Thomas’s research suggests the gable ends were facing the road rather than the length of the property.

My street maps show L shapes which could be either.

Fascinating stuff.

Best wishes,

Chris


Hello Chris,
iam not sure what Backgroundbuilding you mean ?
The Granary is in very Original Shape.Also the Schloss and both lay lengthside to the Street. And yes most of the Buildings are more or less Lshaped. Even the modern Ones of today.
I a earlier post you refer to Michael’s wonderful 1809 blog who refers to a model at the Army museum The only Model or Diurama iknow in the SttkasGranary itself. To Bad that its only for two Hours on Sundays open for the Public. if you reserve a Ticket before.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 16 Jun 2024, 05:53

Thank you once again Eric.

This is really useful.

My apologies as I thought the historic building shown was a view from the Schuttkasten.

This building, lengthwise to the road is described as historic. I will construct it for the project.

I have discussed the building orientation with Michael and the plans I have do seem to suggest that they were not positioned in the style suggested by Thomas’s wonderful research.

The next question is how common were roof tiles in 1809?

I think thatch and wooden shingles would be dominant but Michael thinks tiled roofs were the norm.

I noticed the cars in the granary. Are they of value?

Best wishes,

Chris
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