Work in Progress

Antietam 17th September 1862

Posted by Graeme on 16 Apr 2020, 04:44

Very good progress, I really like the stonework on the recent buildings and the bridge. And the figure conversions are giving some really terrific individual characters.
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Graeme  Australia
 
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Posted by Rich W on 16 Apr 2020, 10:00

Keep up the great work Chris. The end results we all know will be superb!
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Posted by C M Dodson on 22 Apr 2020, 16:47

Orndorff Mill part three.

My project has expanded way beyond my original concept as I discover more about this fascinating subject and it’s many quirks.

However, even I was surprised to find myself researching early American saw and grist mills!

However, onward we go and following a bit of research I have constructed the Orndorff saw mill.

These pictures show the mill in disrepair.

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The metal bridge in the background is the replacement of the damaged Orndorff bridge.

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The construction is card and balsa with two Wills water wheels. Chopped up twigs provide the lumber.

I am not sure if the cardboard saw teeth are correct but they give the idea I feel.

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The water race will use my sand table and watercourse system.

I have loosely arranged the buildings to show the idea.

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Back to chopping up and painting troops I think.

Lots to do.
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Graeme on 22 Apr 2020, 17:43

That is an awesome model!

All of your buildings are fabulous but there's just something special about this one and I think it will look great in the sandbox..

I can't help thinking that Your other houses would have been easier to build if You'd made the sawmill first though.
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Graeme  Australia
 
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Posted by Kostis Ornerakis on 22 Apr 2020, 18:04

Wow!! :love: :-D
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Kostis Ornerakis  Greece
 
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Posted by lobo on 22 Apr 2020, 21:25

1/72? Incredible¡
Congratulations¡
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Posted by Bessiere on 22 Apr 2020, 22:20

Another outstanding construction sir! You keep pushing that needle for quality ever higher.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 30 Apr 2020, 11:29

Conversions

I have been chopping and swopping in order to get the troops I need.

Head swops are the easiest way to make a difference especially if the original is a bit ‘iffy’.

Hence the Italieri crisp heads are grafted onto the Stretlets Whitworth officers which transform them.

The Italieri Union artillery chaps by the addition of pistols and swords make good infantry officers.

The Revel No.3 has an enormously thick lanyard. Horse hair or thin wire is much more effective.

It is really your imagination that is the limit here.

I have rescued an Airfix conversion that I did thirty odd years ago and brought him up to date as a map clutching ADC.

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Lots to do.

Happy modelling.

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 05 May 2020, 10:43

Artillery conversions

The choice of artillery teams and gunners on the market is a bit restricted in my opinion.

The Revell , Stretlets and Imex are good. The Speira figures very nice and Massimos figures are lovely.

I have some SHQ guys which are nice too.

Unfortunately the Italieri figures are all draped up for winter and whilst the heads and arms are useful the rest is not so good.

The horse teams are a fantasy with no riders.

However, I am in need of large numbers of these gentlemen and have had a go at chopping up the Zeveda Guard artillery men to get a bit of variety.

The plastic is a little tough but with care they can be hacked into shape.

I tried the normal artillery set too but the chopping off of the huge blanket rolls and back packs is both difficult and not particularly rewarding.

Hats Austrian artillery riders are much easier due to the softer plastic.

Italieri heads with their lovely detailed faces and green stuff water bottles to cover up ex sword chopping seem to give a good result.

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Lots to do.

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 05 May 2020, 14:33

Apologies, but whilst talking about artillery I came across this wonderful silent film of a RHA horse battery practising deployment but forgot to include it in the above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R0X7CfNBsq4

Many thanks to Mike ‘Bunkermiester’ for his original post.

It is truly fascinating stuff for modellers and war gamers alike.

My only thought was that whilst the drill is smoothly efficient, the ground is flat and unemcumbered.

Personally, this sort of thing brings not only the past alive but puts many war game activities into perspective.

Truly wonderful.

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Rich W on 10 May 2020, 10:05

Fascinating as always to watch your progress!
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Posted by C M Dodson on 11 May 2020, 20:05

Bank Barns

The majority of the barns around Sharpsburg are based on the bank barn system.

The idea was to position the barn on the back of a slope allowing easy access to the upper floor and keeping the lower area more sheltered from the weather . Animals were kept downstairs and crops upstairs .

I found this instructional link to be useful as to their history.

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/master/pnp/habsha ... 92data.pdf

The Sharpsburg barns are enormous structures and I initially considered just ignoring them as their footprint is so large.

However, I feel that a few barns will add to the ambience of the place dependant on the ‘look’ when I start laying everything out.

The Battlefield from Sharpsburg moving north until the Dunkard church looked a bit empty so I thought the Reel barn would be an appropriate start.

David and Sarah Reel and their seven children lived on the farm and evacuated it prior to the battle. Used as a Confederate hospital the barn burnt down trapping a great many wounded in the flames.

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Alexander’s picture clearly shows the scorch marks on the stonework.

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I made my model out of card and balsa and am quite pleased with it. I have started to manufacture door handles from thinned out picture wire and intend to upgrade my earlier buildings now that my experience has grown.

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The ramp is a little steeper than I would have liked but I have to consider space as I do not want a runway. Hopefully, when buried in the sand table the angle will not be so apparent .

I also considered, as so many of these barns are similar, to do a generic base and then attach the wooden upper story. The Sherrick and Orndorff barns have a similar ‘flying ‘ element and this has worked well.

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The Mumma and Roulette barns are enormous and I do not think that there will be space for them as they are so close together. I am looking for rolling farmland, not Manhattan.

Lots to do.
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by OwenChpw on 12 May 2020, 01:22

Very impressed. You can clearly see the care in this project with the research and the thought into the scratch-building. Great stuff.
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OwenChpw  Australia
 
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Posted by Susofrick on 12 May 2020, 10:55

Maybe not Manhattan, but quite many buildings! Huge? Probably! Worth to see? Definitely!
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Susofrick  Sweden
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Posted by C M Dodson on 14 May 2020, 13:49

Barns, Part two

I have now finished the Orndorff / Sherrick barn barn.

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It’s not a copy of the original but I think it would be recognisable to their owners.

I have noticed that door handles have moved a little and appear larger than they should be. The camera is, as always, merciless!

Happy modelling.

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Rich W on 16 May 2020, 14:22

Great progress as always Chris!
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Posted by John Simmons on 16 May 2020, 21:28

Hi Chris,
These look beautiful. People like me are going to get over-eager to see bigger parts of your re-creation. I've never known what scale buildings to aim for on my wargame battlefields. True 1/72 buildings look enormous. 15mm look better on the table, but can look silly when figures are taller than the doors. How do you deal with this?
John
John Simmons  United States of America
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 17 May 2020, 08:51

Thank you to everyone for their kind comments and their interest in my project.

In answer to John’s question I would say that some measurements are a given.

As stated, doorways need to be 25mm (ish) otherwise our troops will not be able to get in.

Similarly, height is an issue, so once again a normal house will be around 55mm to the gutters as people have to stand up in them.

The ‘look’ of the thing drives me, so on the Otto house for instance I did away with the shutters which then allowed me to compress its length.

I use as stated the sash windows so that is another given when building historical buildings. Mr Crynns rightly pointed out on the Miller building that they were too big in relation to the area taken up on the original.

Unless you want huge edifices, compromises need to be made wether it be compressing the buildings dimensions or using smaller windows which may look silly.

Have a play with some cardboard until you get the ‘feel’ of what you are looking for.

Practise makes you better as some of my Ligny ( many now binned) strictures will arrest.

Mr Benno boy has some wonderful ideas and is well worth looking into.

His brickwork idea is super.

Best wishes,

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 20 May 2020, 14:07

The Clipp House

Located on the Roulette Lane leading to the now infamous ‘Bloody Lane’ once stood the tenant property owned by William Roulette but occupied by a Mr. A Clipp.

The property, now demolished, was a one and a half story frame house.

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I have used the picture as a reference. The still standing Piper slave house gives an idea in my opinion of the more simplified construction and features of this type of property. Indeed, some of Gardner’s pictures of Sharpsburg show very basic features rather than the grandeur of the farm houses.

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Balsa wood forms the modelling medium, measured in basic proportions to the picture and sketch allowing for window and door sizes.

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It helps from experience to add the ‘furniture’ to doors ( from card and wire) prior to fitting canopies etc in order to paint them.

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Cut wire forms the hinges and a Wills slate plastic roof tops it off.

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I score the woodwork to represent the planking with a modelling knife.


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The chimney was a piece of balsa rod, covered with decorators caulk and then scribed with a stone effect.

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Lots to do.
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Egbert on 20 May 2020, 15:39

Hi Chris,
you keep us amazed again and again by the wonderful houses you are building.
I did not count, but I think you have already built a whole village for the "Antietam battlefield"!?
Indeed ... lots to do... ;)
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Egbert  Germany
 
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