Work in Progress

Antietam 17th September 1862

Posted by C M Dodson on 15 Nov 2021, 10:12

As part of my ongoing research I located the film that was filmed on the actual battlefield with the assistance of the NOS some years ago.

It is splendid stuff both as a narrative and also uniform/equipment/ scenery etc as they were meticulous in their research.

Happy viewing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tse4pbQp9cs

Best wishes,

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Photoro Man on 24 Nov 2021, 20:01

This is DARTH VADER in person talking. So, must be GOOD!!!!!!!!!
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Posted by C M Dodson on 27 Nov 2021, 15:38

Thank you everyone including Lord Vader.

Tents and conversions

My very good friend Thomas Mischak has sent me the new Hagen command set along with the Lee and Longstreet set for my project.

I can never thank him enough for his kindness.

I have decided to utilise these figures for a Union command scene with our friend George.

The Union HQ was at the Pry house but I do not wish to construct this edifice for just one picture as it is off the table. I therefore thought a command tent would be in order.

Image

Another head swap and ‘Little Mac’ is busy pondering his latest West Point theory presentation in a command tent. Mr Porter ( Fifth Corps) is in attendance.

The tent is balsa , picture wire and tissue. I would recommend using split twigs as uprights as the construction is very flimsy.

The Union staff set up telescopes and binoculars for the good general to observe the action.

I fashioned a large spotting telescope from a thin rod of plastic with glued tissue paper to enhance its bulk and lens/ eyepiece. It is mounted on the Stretlets camera tripod.

George’s map is a reduced print ‘ Ala Egbert style’ taken from an original army map.

I was going to use four horse teams for the artillery but felt that the six horse teams had a better look.

Image

This means lots extra horses so I used tissue and greenstuff to make up the riderless horse packs on the Zvezda Russian artillery horses.

I also found some more surrendering Germans and a cowboy.

They chop up nicely to make Confederate prisoners.

The Stretlets Union officer pose comes in for criticism from PSR and quite rightly so.

However, I think that the idea is sound and by replacing the hand and sword with an Italieri cavalry chaps weapon a more acceptable result is achieved .

The Stretlets bugler in enhanced by chopping off his trumpet and replacing it with an Imex bugle.

Incidentally, this period of the war saw the increasing introduction of bugles as a more efficient signalling system than that of drums.
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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01 May 2015, 18:48

Posted by Minuteman on 27 Nov 2021, 20:01

More interesting and informative commentary in the 'build up' to this much-anticipated diorama. It is always interesting to me to have an inside track on how conversions and figures are used to achieve a convincing group of 1/72 model soldiers...so thanks for the insights Chris!
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Minuteman  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Peter on 30 Nov 2021, 22:47

Wonderfull work on that command set! :thumbup:
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by C M Dodson on 07 Dec 2021, 16:45

Cold garages and conversions

The weather has been below freezing and I have not been able to work on the battlefield because of the cold.

However, all is not lost and three more brigades of Confederates and two Union brigades have been completed.

The Mumma farm complex was burnt down as it was considered a potential haven for Union sharpshooters .

This is obvious on my recreation of the field.

A Staff Sergeant James F. Clark was in charge of a detail from the 3rd North Carolina infantry from Ripley’s brigade that initiated the fire .

He actually wrote to the Mummas after the war to apologise for the destruction.

I wanted to recreate this event and to that effect chopped up some troops and am pleased with the results.

Image

More casualties representing gunners and various head/ arm swaps for officers are in evidence.

I found two Jacklex metal wheels and sliced them up to represent battle damage on a couple of Italieri cannon that I also enhanced with the prologue ropes.

Whoops, there are mould lines on the barrels. The camera sees all.

I have also drawn up the timetable for the action and am finalising my rules for the conduct of the troops.

Thomas Mischak also found this super link.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1Rs5C8 ... Q9&index=9

Lots of ideas here.

I am not sure about the date as according to PSR some of the figures involved were not produced then.

Once the weather warms up I am hoping that Hookers attack can commence.

Lots to do.

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
Posts: 1962
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Posted by C M Dodson on 05 Jan 2022, 19:25

Bits and bobs



Following Thomas’s Gettysburg link I selected a few Hat drums and fashioned tissue paper webbing to represent discarded drums.

Image

I also purchased some Speria rifled muskets which are nice if not a bit flimsy.

Massimo’s Hagen wounded set also has some truly excellent and also more durable weapons for dressing the battlefield.

I found this informative video on sharp shooting weaponry.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=sLQm3f-a-kw

The Confederate forces had it seems ‘sharpshooter’ battalions who in reality were effectively skirmishers.

The really good shots had specialist sights on their weapons and were allowed free range on the battlefield .

The British Whitworth rifle was a specially prized weapon with excellent long distance accuracy but cost a fortune.

At $1000 in gold ( $27000 at todays prices) for a base model it was an extremely rare battlefield sight.

It’s unique side telescope and hexagonal barrel we’re its distinctive features.

I therefore decided on a couple of Enfield equipped sharpshooters and constructed the brass optical sight with plastic stretched sprue.

I also have constructed more explosions as the first lot have gone missing.

This time I used wire, rather than sprue as it is more flexible.

I spray of hair product and a dusting of sand produces the debris flung up by the explosion.

Incidentally I found an excellent reference video on Civil War fuses which really explains the mechanics and why the South was disadvantaged.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ixX2rzH-0Sk

Excellent stuff.

Lots to do.
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by Peter on 05 Jan 2022, 20:10

Lots to do and lots to see for us! Keep them coming Chris. in the mean time I keep looking at the movie you are making in another topic! ;-) :thumbup:
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Minuteman on 05 Jan 2022, 20:48

Keep up the good work, very much looking forward to the next batches of pictures!

Incidentally, I recently took delivery of some French Napoleonic dragoon muskets from Spiera and cannot fault the professionalism and quailty of this producer. First class.
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Minuteman  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 06 Jan 2022, 09:41

Hello Mr M.

I agree with you that the Speira range is now vast and top quality.

The fragile description was an observation, not a criticism.

Best wishes,

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
Posts: 1962
Member since:
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