Work in Progress

Antietam 17th September 1862

Posted by Emperor on 25 Sep 2020, 20:22

Man you are respecting every tiny detail...It is great to watch how you make everything...Plus you follow the historical accounts...
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Posted by Captain Sibourne on 25 Sep 2020, 23:03

why haven't I been following this thread more assiduously? Some brilliant stuff here, the inventiveness is very inspiring!
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Posted by fpt on 26 Sep 2020, 05:02

Excellent photo of explosions. Please explain: "Ground explosions are created by finely stretching heated sprue to length."

Would you have a photo that would clarify?

Thanks.

FPT
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Posted by C M Dodson on 26 Sep 2020, 07:22

Please accept my apologies.

In my senility I omitted a construction picture to explain the technique.

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Plastic sprue is melted over a flame until it is soft.

Then you pull both ends gently to stretch the plastic to the thickness required.

Let the plastic cool otherwise you will have a painful finger decoration.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by OwenChpw on 27 Sep 2020, 01:03

I've tried similar softening techniques with hot water, but it never seems to be quite hot enough - using fire though seems better but could ruin the detail of miniatures. Guess I'd only ever do this with sprues.
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Posted by fpt on 27 Sep 2020, 01:39

Thanks for the info and photo. I now have a use for sprues other than just throwing them out.

Regards.

FPT
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Posted by C M Dodson on 30 Sep 2020, 21:38

I was doing some research and came across this ‘War of Rights’ promotional video that sets out the terrain for Antietam.

The detail is superb although there are a number of mistakes, ie the Otto Farm , opposite the Sherrick Farm has disappeared.

Nevertheless, good stuff for terrain dressing ideas.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0yV1Nbx4uU

Happy viewing,

Chris
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Posted by C M Dodson on 04 Oct 2020, 17:01

Wagons roll

The Civil war armies used wagons by their thousands in order to transport munitions, foodstuffs and necessaries from the railheads to the battlefields.

Whilst the Confederates used anything to hand including captured US stock the principal US vehicle was a purpose built wagon, authorised in 1855 and produced with various modifications until 1865.

The vehicle weighed 2000 pounds and could carry a similar weight.

Originally designed for use with four horses or mules this specification was later upgraded to six animals.

An interesting point is that the teamster rode the inside rear mount and was not positioned on the vehicle ala John Wayne etc.

Here is a drawing I found showing the standard army wagon and it’s principal features.

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These contemporary Pictures illustrate the wagon.

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Here is the basic uncovered wagon.

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Jacklex miniatures do a very nice wagon with mules but it is not cheap so I decided to utilise the IMEX wagons rather than build from scratch.

I firstly used cardboard to represent the tailboard detail.

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I constructed the front tool box from balsa with card hinges.

The hooped structure I was going to build with card as the originals used wooden hoops.

However, picture wire works well as it can be easily bent to shape.

To provide the accommodation holds for the hoops I heated a needle, held by pillars over a gas flame and then inserted it in the base.

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Once completed the brake system was made out of balsa.

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Toilet paper cut to size completes the canvas which these vehicles were uniformly equipped with as I found tissue to be too uniform in texture.

I was going to paint the canvas’s but I think they look good ‘au natural’.

The horse team in this instance, are from the Revel and Imex sets with tissue covers and Hat Austrian trails.

A web site suggested that the bodywork should be a light blue with Venetian red wheels. My research suggests that the monochrome pictures indicate a uniform colour. Mr Adkin in his Gettysburg companion has them in green as per my initial picture so green it is.

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The camera has revealed a few bits that need attention but I think they have the ‘feel’ of the period.

Incidentally I found a fascinating link on Civil war logistics .

All you need to know about kitting out,supplying and feeding a civil war soldier!

https://transportation.army.mil/History ... icle_1.pdf

Fascinating stuff.

Chris
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Posted by Peter on 04 Oct 2020, 21:57

Wonderfull conversions! :thumbup:

Lots to view! ;-)
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Beano Boy on 04 Oct 2020, 22:28

The wagons look great including the canvas tarps!
Years ago i made paper card wagons with Hat Wheels. BB
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Posted by lobo on 05 Oct 2020, 06:19

Chris,
What a great investigation, and conversion. Your work is an example of constancy.
Congratulations.
Antonio.
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Posted by MABO on 15 Oct 2020, 08:26

Thanks for all the infos about the wagons. And congrats to your own constructions!
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Posted by Bessiere on 16 Oct 2020, 04:03

The mark of a master is attention and detail to the more mundane and overlooked elements. Many of us will skimp on logistics since wargaming puts a lot of pressure to paint fighting units. These wagons look fantastic, awesome job on replicating the real thing. Thanks to your inspiration I am currently painting some dead and wounded conversions. Thank you also for sharing not just your pictures but fully describing the process which is a great learning tool for anyone interested. I eagerly await the battle itself - Bessiere
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Posted by Emperor on 16 Oct 2020, 13:18

When project is massive that is great...
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Posted by C M Dodson on 20 Oct 2020, 16:20

Despatch rider

Thank you to everyone for their kind words which are most appreciated.

I noticed this super piece of modelling from the Gerschite in Miniturian forum as part of Salaberry’s Napoleonic project.

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The sheer dynamism of the subject is in my opinion brilliant.

Therefore I thought some chopping should be attempted to see if I could get something similar.

A poor Itallieri US cavalryman was selected and by chopping his leg off and rotating it I got the look I was after.

Unravelled picture wire provides new reins and the stirrups.

A little greenstuff fills the poor chap’s crotch.

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Hopefully, he will look the part after painting.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by MABO on 20 Oct 2020, 18:39

Very dynamic pose! Even if it hurts... 8)
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Posted by Susofrick on 21 Oct 2020, 08:29

He will speak in a quite falsetto voice. Don't think I want to be one of your toy soldiers. but it's good work.
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