Work in Progress

Antietam 17th September 1862

Posted by Graeme on 08 Sep 2019, 04:22

Your buildings don't need to audition, I think they've got the job. :-D

Very interesting story about the timber building made to look more impressive with plaster fake stonework; not so very different to the very grand Regency buildings in Britain I suppose.
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Graeme  Australia
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 08 Sep 2019, 16:14

I have now added the roof, drain pipes etc and the building is starting to take shape.

I am pleased that it is starting to look like the original.

Lots of tidying up, glazing, painting and a bit of weathering still to do.

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In the meantime, Mr Miller had a large barn as indeed it seems everyone had.

I have been fortunate enough to purchase William Frassanito’s book Antietam, The photographic Legacy of America’s bloodiest day.

Mr F has researched Mr Gardeners original photographs at the Library of Congress which are of great interest as they show more than the usual copies that have been used in the past.

One of them is the only known picture, bottom right of the Miller barn in 1862.

Fantastic!

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Google Earth shows the current barn on its foundations with the ramp to the main area and the underground section access at the side.

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As I use a sand table excavating is no problem but the damp is potentially one as it will warp cardboard.

I have therefore constructed a base which can be buried in the right proportions out of balsa with caulk stonework.

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The barn is thin balsa scored to create the strip effect of planking.

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I have positioned reinforcing posts in the corners to provide ridigity.

I am not sure about the height of the edifice as the barn seems fairly low. However, there are plenty of large barns around the area and as it sits on the base I have lots of flexility as building a lower one is easy enough.

I will take a view upon completion.
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 09 Sep 2019, 17:14

The camera is a wonderful tool for exposing your mistakes and sloppy work.

After comparing my work with the original it’s obvious that the windows are different!

Luckily, very thin strips of paper have saved the day although I have spotted at least one that requires replacing.

Nevertheless, apart from some glazing and tidying up Mr Miller’s house is complete.

I am quite pleased with it and hopefully it will sit nicely on its little hill surrounded by Hookers Union onslaught.

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Happy modelling.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 11 Sep 2019, 18:45

The Rohrbach bridge or lower bridge

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This bridge crossing the Antietam stream south east of Sharpsburg was built in 1836 at a cost of $3200.

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It was closed to traffic on 1966 and now remains as a memorial to all those who fought and perished here. It’s usual title is the Burnside bridge after Ambrose Burnsides numerous attempts to cross it after eventually deciding to obey orders.

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There is a very similar bridge, the Middle bridge a little further north so I decided to build the main section twice and then add the fiddly bits separately.

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Once again, the bridge is not to a true scale as this would look like Arnhem on my battlefield. Hopefully it will look the part and work well.

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Having cut out the spans, caulked them up, I rested these on the pillars of balsa.

The buttresses are again balsa which will be built up with caulk. I considered plaster of Paris but felt it unnecessary for my purpose.

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When dried I used paper to create the arches. These were then caulked and scribed with the stonework.

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A thin strip of balsa was then stuck on the top which will be scored to represent the planking.

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Lots to do, but it’s a change from buildings.
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Posted by Beano Boy on 11 Sep 2019, 21:50

Congratulations C M D, it all looks Great. :thumbup: BB
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Posted by C M Dodson on 13 Sep 2019, 17:56

Rohrbach bridge part two

I have now added the ‘wings’ of the bridge and have built up the piers.

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The colour of the bridge seems to vary with the action of the sunlight from grey to a sandstone like warmth.

This is a picture I took from Mr Toomb’s Georgian position showing a light grey colour back in 2002 with the Feldmarschall.

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The NPS renovation looks great and gives us buff, grey and dark grey.

The underlying geology here is limestone and it would make sense to use local resources rather than bring in materials from afar.

I have therefore decided to have a grey bridge with buff bits and a weathered look.

I am very pleased with my piece of cardboard.

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Off now to the monstrous edifice known as the Mumma farm.
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Posted by Egbert on 13 Sep 2019, 20:33

Wonderful done...looks really good! :thumbup:
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Egbert  Germany
 
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Posted by Beano Boy on 14 Sep 2019, 01:33

Fantastic end result on your bridge, it really is rather cool. BB
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Posted by C M Dodson on 15 Sep 2019, 09:33

Walls

We can learn a lot from our railway modelling friends and a quick search on U Tube gave the answer to the walls I wish to construct.

I have the plastic type but was looking for something more realistic for Antietam.

The answer, build your own!

First make a mould from cardboard for your wall size.

Then mix PVA glue and fish gravel ( of the size you require) in a bowl.

Line the mould with cling film and pour your mix in.

Tamp down and leave for a coupe of days to harden.

Remove from mould, clean up and paint.

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I am going for the limestone look, so this season darling.

Happy modelling.
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Posted by Graeme on 16 Sep 2019, 18:59

The painted bridge looks fabulous.

Interesting technique for the walls, and that example looks very good. Just don't eat muesli bars while you're making them though. :mrgreen:
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Graeme  Australia
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 09 Oct 2019, 16:48

Samuel Mumma Farm

Samuel and his second wife, Elizabeth, along with ten of their children evacuated their substantial property leaving most of their worldly goods including the silver, in their flight.

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The property was set ablaze by the Confederate forces on the 17th in order to deprive it’s use to Union sharpshooters.

As a result of the damage being due to enemy action no compensation was paid by the US Government.

The family resided at the Sherrick Farm after the battle until their devastated property could be rebuilt.

As stated before it has come as a complete surprise to learn of the amount of wealth accumulated in this area. The farmsteads were huge and very ornate for the time.

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Once again there is a wealth of information about this substantial property including the Library of Congress.

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The property is wooden and I chosen to use balsa, suitably scored to represent the walls. I am aware that this farm could develop into an office block due to the ground scale and have therefore left off the side extension. I hope the good Mr Mumma ( produced Moo Ma apparently) will forgive me.

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After lining out and fitting the windows I have assembled the basic structure prior to commencing the detailed work.

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I do like setting models ablaze but this one may well be spared destruction due to the effort constructing it.

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Lots to do.

Chris
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Posted by Peter on 09 Oct 2019, 17:06

It all looks fantastic Chris! Go on! :thumbup:
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Posted by Susofrick on 10 Oct 2019, 10:01

Agree with Peter! That really is some serious modelling!!! :shock: :shock: :shock: Mumma is what we drink for Christmas. And, no, youwill have trouble getting drunk by it!
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Posted by C M Dodson on 12 Oct 2019, 17:04

Mumma part 2

I have now added the shutters, constructed the rear porch and have commenced the front columns.

An initial coat of paint followed by scoring of the wood to create a lap effect has also been done.

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The columns were constructed from plastic spruce on a small plinth.

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The model still has a long way to go before touching up the paint splashes etc but at least it is moving in the right direction.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 15 Oct 2019, 16:33

I have now added the roof and chimney pots.

The drainpipes and guttering apart from the main porch one have been added too.

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The front porch has been constructed with balsa and cut down plastic railway fencing.

Whilst it is not entirely correct I feel that it gives the correct impression.

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Tidying up and painting are required but the end is in sight.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 16 Oct 2019, 15:54

The Mary Loacher Cabin ( The Alfred Poffenberger Farm)

Built in approximately 1760 and located just west of the West wood this farm was leased to Alfred from Mary who resided in Lancaster, Pennsylvania following her marriage to Jacob Loacher.

It was used as a Confederate field hospital during the battle and was very close to the fighting.

Alfred tried unsuccessfully to claim compensation after the battle and eventually moved to Iowa in 1870. However the farm stayed in the family name after his step brother George purchased the property in 1898. The building and land were eventually donated to the National Park service in 1991.

This picture taken in 1940 and the present one show that is now in a very sorry state although restoration is planned.

Once again the Library of Congress has proven invaluable.

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The property was a ‘half and half’ cabin being logs/caulk at one end and planking at the other.

I commenced by building a card skeleton and then added the balsa planked area and twigs from the garden.

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Decorators caulk then was applied to the logged area.

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Sanding, trimming, cleaning up and window fitting next.
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Posted by Susofrick on 17 Oct 2019, 10:07

Like this a lot! And it's really mumma (you can use the word for something you like a lot too :-D ) for the eyes!
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Posted by Graeme on 18 Oct 2019, 04:10

Looks like these American buildings are throwing up lots of new challenges, so many different styles. But they're turning out every bit as good as your Belgian buildings. :thumbup:
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Graeme  Australia
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 18 Oct 2019, 17:20

I have now completed the Mumma farmhouse and am very pleased with it.

As stated before the Confederates burnt it down but I do not fancy that. However, if in my re fight it is necessary, the interior has a position to place one of my ‘burn trays’ and that with a damaged roof, should look the part hopefully.

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Happy modelling.

Chris
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Posted by C M Dodson on 21 Oct 2019, 14:40

I was not sure about a tiled roof as some pictures have the tin variant on some of the LOC pictures.

However, I am of the opinion that these are later roof variants as the main picture clearly shows either tiles or shingles.

I stained the whole building in a black ink after painting to represent nearly one hundred years of weathering on the structure.

The girls have popped round for a look.

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I am pleased with my log cabin which hopefully will be the basis of a hospital scene in the future.

Next up, slicing the Confederate command and the Roulette Farm
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