Work in Progress

Antietam 17th September 1862

Posted by Graeme on 08 Jul 2019, 12:49

You've chosen the heads for McClellan and Hooker very well, I think they've really got the look of them.

Nice job of recreating the McClellan picture.
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Graeme  Australia
 
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Posted by huib on 08 Jul 2019, 13:59

Great result with your Generals. They really resemble their original examples!

Something about the corn crop. I think the corn planted in straigth lines with pathways inbetween is very much the result of mechanised agriculture, which was only in it's infancy during the ACW. I think the corn fields could have been really dense in this period, so difficult to pentrate, and with extremely limited vision (<1m), leading to disorientation and fear. I think the main difference with jungle is that the corn fields in these days would not have been very large, but rather small crops of land, compared to nowadays cornfields.
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huib  Netherlands
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 08 Jul 2019, 18:46

Hello Mr H and thank you for your kind words.

The link seems to have failed so I will try again.

All you need to know about Civil War cornfields!


http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=359890


D. R Millers field was 400 metres by 200 metres approximately.

Similar fields were the Pry and Proffenburger family’s amongst others.

The corn had to be harvested by hand and therefore access by foot or small cart was essential otherwise what was the point of sowing the crop?

The link explains the planting process and is fascinating.

I never thought I would become a farmer.

Next up Ambrose Burnside, his whiskers and his silly hat.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by Bluefalchion on 08 Jul 2019, 20:42

I have to admit that I am rather meh about the ACW. But your exhaustive research and astonishing conversions are piquing my interest to quite some extent.
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Bluefalchion  United States of America
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 09 Jul 2019, 08:39

Apologies, the reference to Pry should read Piper.

Mr Piper had a large cornfield and apple orchard just behind what was to be known forever as the ‘Bloody Lane’.

Thank you to Mr F for your interest.

I have concentrated on Napoleonic's of late and this digression is becoming fascinating with all the stories behind the stories.

The bonus is that you can paint up masses of units in the time it takes to paint up fifty Highlanders!

Happy modelling.

Chris
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Posted by C M Dodson on 09 Jul 2019, 14:44

Major General Ambrose Everett Burnside

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After leaving West Point,Burnside was appointed to garrison duty in Mexico City following the end of the Mexican war.

Wounded in the neck by an Apache arrow in 1849, Burnside, following promotion, moved to Rhode Island. After resigning his commission he concentrated on the production of his invention, the Burnside rifle.

This breach loading weapon used a brass cartridge principle that we know today and was a great success.

Following a dalliance with politics and the destruction by fire of his factory, the financially ruined Burnside went west to become treasurer of the Illinois Central Railroad where he befriended a certain George McClellan !

Upon the outbreak of war he worked his way through the ranks and despite being offered his friends job as commander of the Army of the Potomac after the Peninsular campaign and again ,following second Bull run he remained loyal to McClellan.

He was given command of the right wing of the Army at the commencement of the Maryland campaign, a position that was to create confusion on the 17th.

I wanted to recreate the ‘dunces’ hat image of Burnside, together with those famous whiskers.

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Using the Imex Union artillery officer I chopped off the kepi before chopping him in half. He was then mounted on a Italieri US cavalry pair of legs. A new sword and binocular case were then added.

The hat was fashioned out of greenstuff, hollowed in the middle and mounted on his head.

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The horse is from the excellent but incredibly rare HAT Napoleonic command set.

Why has this not been re released?

A most pleasing result of this most interesting character.

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Happy modelling.

Chris
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Posted by huib on 09 Jul 2019, 21:22

Wow, good representation of Major General Ambrose Everett Burnside!
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huib  Netherlands
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 10 Jul 2019, 15:52

Major General Joseph King Fenno Mansfield

Mansfield entered West Point at the incredible age of fourteen and graduated second out of a class of forty.

He was engaged in the Mexican war where he was wounded and following promotion ended up as the Inspector General of the American army.

The outbreak of the Civil war saw him promoted to a Brigadier General. However his combat experience was effectively zero, which saw him he passed over for further promotion due to this and his age.

Here he is looking very splendid in his dress uniform.

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However, his quest for action was eventually fulfilled with a promotion to command of the X11 Corps.

Apparently he was an active chap, liked by his troops, many of whom were raw recruits.

However, his officers were not so happy with his appointment considering him nervous with a lack of combat experience. Unfortunately his experience of ‘ seeing the elephant’ at Antietam was to prove his last.

I selected an Austrian Art Miniturian from my very good friend Thomas Mischak and removed the hand holding the hat, replacing it with a pair of binoculars.

A new binocular case and a head from the Italieri cavalry set saw him completed.

I selected another Italieri horse, removed the furniture and put the two together.

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We shall see if he lasts a little longer than his protégée.

Chris
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Posted by Bluefalchion on 10 Jul 2019, 16:15

Is yout Mansfield a head-swap? Looks good...
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Bluefalchion  United States of America
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 10 Jul 2019, 17:09

Hello Mr F and thank you for your kind interest.

Yes, the Austrian general has previously been decapitated for another fellow.

The head is from the Italieri US cavalry set as I was looking for a nice looking face with a beard that looked a bit like Mansfield.

Too many figure manufacturers seem to think blobs for hands and faces are acceptable in my opinion.

If we look to the 28 mm world there are some modelling miracles of personality being displayed.

Nevertheless, things seem to be improving.
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Posted by Kostis Ornerakis on 11 Jul 2019, 18:18

Hello mr Chris!
Wonderful research and work so far!! :thumbup: :-D
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Kostis Ornerakis  Greece
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 11 Jul 2019, 19:01

Hagerstown Pike fencing

I have been experimenting with the various fence styles present at Antietam and found this marvellous research documentary.

https://youtu.be/StvjCIZTxxc

Fences were essentially of a ‘ split rail’ type, ie a log is split and the poles then used to create the barrier.

‘Worm ‘ or ‘snake’ fencing were easy to erect and from a Civil War soldiers perspective easy to pull down for firewood.

The Hagerstown pike had a different more substantial split rail fence featuring fence posts. Whilst this could be dismantled, the prospect of doing this under fire would not have been pleasant.

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Also, the pike had fencing on both sides creating a formidable military obstacle.

I have obtained, Antietam, the photographic legacy of America’s bloodiest day by William A. Frassantio.

This gentleman has researched Alexander Gardner’s photographic record of the battle searching the National Archives for the original prints and reproducing them in their original format. Wonderful research material.

Looking at the fence gives us details which are often overlooked.

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The fence clearly has six bars, not the usual five so often represented.

The height is stated at five feet and the width seems roughly nine feet.

Having foraged in the garden for some nice twigs I chopped them to size and then split them as per the original. The ends were then champhered, again as per the original procedure.

I originally used 2 mm balsa but feel that 1 mm is easier to work with for the posts.

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The posts are one centimetre longer in order to plant them into my sand table.

I tried carving out the holes and also using a bradel. I am not sure if the carving will show up properly but we shall see with practice.

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Perhaps a double section of fencing with the holes in the middle one might make sense.

The posts are then attached to the rails.

The posts will require painting but I feel that I am moving in the right direction.

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Happy modelling.

Chris
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 12 Jul 2019, 11:56

Apologies Mr FrassanITo.

Stubby fingers again.

Chris
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Posted by C M Dodson on 12 Jul 2019, 19:11

Major General Edwin vose Sumner

Edwin Summer joined the United States Army in 1819 and saw service in various Indian wars and also the Mexican war. He earned his name ‘ Old Bull’ or ‘ Bull head’ as legend has it that a musket ball bounced off his head!

Here he is looking very dashing for a man of his age!

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I am not sure what the horse is thinking.

Having initially being sent at the commencement of the Civil war to California to replace a certain, Albert Sydney Johnston ( CSA) he returned to command a Corps in the Peninsular campaign.

McClellan said of him ‘ he has proved a greater fool than I had supposed’ after the battle of Wiliamsburg. However, at Seven Pines he saved the day and probably his career.

Whilst apparently holding old fashioned ideas on discipline he was respected by his troops in the Second Corps and had the unique position of being oldest general in either army.

I selected an Italieri US cavalryman and swapped his head with an Italieri Confederate cavalryman. A new binocular case and he is ready for action.

The horse is from the HAT Napoleonic officers offering.

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There is a little tidying up required but I am quite pleased with him.

Chris
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Posted by Graeme on 13 Jul 2019, 01:51

I think the horse knows he's got an apple in his pocket.

These commanders are progressing very nicely, your troops will be well lead.
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Graeme  Australia
 
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Posted by Traveller1865 on 13 Jul 2019, 16:05

C M Dodson wrote:Major General Joseph Hooker

A West Point career officer ‘ Fighting’ Joe Hooker, despite the efforts of General Winfield Scott , returned to the ranks as a Brigadier General, at the start of the war and following success at the Battle of Williamsburg was eventually promoted to command the 1st Corps in time for Antietam.

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I researched various contemporary sources and it seems that a white horse was his mount at the engagement.

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This one is at Chancellorsville after his promotion, again a white horse.

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I selected an Italieri US cavalryman and sliced his wrist off.

To this I mounted a new hand holding binoculars from the Italieri mounted artillery officer. A new sword handle was taken from a Stretlets British ADC.

I made a binocular case from greenstuff along with its webbing.

However, upon painting him up his face was dreadful. A blob with a nose.

Not to be outdone, I sliced a Waterloo 1815 highlander officers bonnet off, did the pliers hollowing out the hat thing and remounted the lot on the original body.

I am quite pleased with him although the picture has revealed a few touch ups that are required.

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One of the problems it seems to me with this period in our scale is the lack of staff and generals.

Stretlets have had a good go at this but there is nothing like the variety that our Napoleonic friends have to draw upon.

Perhaps a Speria opportunity?

I for one would be keen.

Happy Modelling,

Chris


Looking good this. I would also love to have correct mounted command figures for both sides, and been thinking of starting a crowd funding to complete it. Problem is people will call it a cash grab and be very negative about it, personally I have no problem crowdfunding figures for other companies and have participated in some before, but everyone is different.
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Posted by C M Dodson on 17 Jul 2019, 18:43

Hagerstown pike part two

I have been trying to improve my fencing in order to go full speed ahead in production.

I tried using 1mm posts at each end with some success as when they about they are the same width as the 2mm centre post.

This however is very delicate in what already is a delicate operation.

I have decided that the best solution without going bonkers is to use a 2mm posts in the centre and at one end. They can then butt join the next section, gate whatever.

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This seems to work well and I did a little test shot which I am quite pleased with.

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I have this wonderful map showing the different types of fencing present.

I have a lot of fence making to do and this type of fence from my photographic trawling seems to be everywhere.

Thankfully, worm fencing, the other predominant type is easy!

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Also, this little map shows the limestone outcrops present in the area.

How brilliant is that?

Happy modelling.

Chris
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Posted by C M Dodson on 18 Jul 2019, 17:18

Worm/ Snake fencing.

Many parts of the battlefield had a form of fencing known as worm or snake fencing.

Split rails were laid on top of each other in order to build a simple fence, anchored by cross trees at the corners.

A rail was placed across these posts at the top to keep larger animals in or out.
Sometimes a low stone border wall would be placed at the base rather than rails to keep smaller animals secure.

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One of the most famous section of this fence type can be found, restored to its original form at ‘ Bloody lane’.

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I thought these fences, being just stacked split rail fencing would be easy.

I have again been in the garden to find and split my twigs as per the original method.

Unfortunately, unlike the original there is no weight.

This means they are very fiddly and fall apart very easily.

Not much good when my smoke machine blows them towards the Potomac!

I feel that I will have to glue sections together and hand assemble the connections where necessary.

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The photo shows areas to be improved but overall I am quite pleased with the mark 1 snake fence.

Happy modelling.

Farmer Chris
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Posted by C M Dodson on 02 Aug 2019, 20:14

Snake fencing part two.

The fragility of the original snake fencing led me to rebuild the system with the first four rails being spot glued to make a 20CM ‘run’ with three sections.

I have seen particularly sharp angles on display but personally anything too much off the ‘run’ angle will start to look like Agincourt rather than Antietam.

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The sand table will allow the stake and rider element to be added to complete the fence.

To this end Der Feldmarschall’s baking tray is back in action.

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By constructing interlocking elements that are then held in place by the stake posts the fence should be sturdy enough for action.

A pile of split twigs will allow for the action of the troops pulling down sections to facilitate advances, defences etc without having to destroy the originals.

Lots to do.

Chris
Last edited by Peter on 11 Aug 2019, 17:26, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Deleted double post!
C M Dodson  United Kingdom
 
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Posted by huib on 06 Aug 2019, 21:25

Very nice historical research into fences!
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