Work in Progress

La Guardia Svizzera nella Piazza di San Pietro

Posted by Santi Pérez on 30 Dec 2016, 21:31

Thank you for your comments, Peter and Wiking. And congratulations, Wiking, you are very smart. In this post you will discover and confirm the origin of each figure.

I think that this is the correct section where I must post the rest of the information and pictures about the diorama’s making process. I will return to the Gallery section to post all the pictures of the finished work.

Now we have arrived to the figures. Starting with the civilian people, the first problem I faced was finding 1/72 civilians in modern clothes and without weapons. I had no success in finding discontinued Preiser 1/72 walking people, so I had to continue searching. It’s true that there are some civilian people available from several manufacturers, but most of them wear clothes in a fashion prior to 1970 and/or are armed with all kind of weapons: AK47, missile launchers, SMG, etc.

So I decided that I had to make conversions to get what I was looking for. The same applies to the Swiss Guards, because the two main poses in the set, despite being superb, didn’t match what I wanted.

Almost all of the figures in the diorama have small or great conversions, and some of them weren’t easy at all to do. My conversion techniques include the repositioning of parts in one figure, “transplants” of parts from one figure to another, carving parts and adding new ones with white wood glue (PVA), creating new parts from paper, wood or plastic, etc., as you will see in the upcoming pictures.

Here is the origin of every civilian in the diorama and the results of the conversions, ready for the painting work.

The first one: the Spanish male tourist (from Caesar Modern Militia set).

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Next: the Spanish female tourist (from Caesar Modern Militia set with arms from Atlantic-Nexus Ancient life set).

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Next: the Shepherd dog (from Orion Modern Russian Federals set).

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Next: the black man (from Caesar Modern Militia set with arms from Caesar Egyptian Sherdens set).

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Next: the former Swiss Guard (from Orion Modern Russian Federals set with head from Orion Roman Sailors set).

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Next: the nun (from Caesar Partisans in Europe set).

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Next: the businesswoman (from Caesar WWII Underground Resisters set).
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Next: the Argentinian father with daughter (from Imex American Pioneers set).

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Next: the Argentinian son (from Imex American Pioneers set).

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The last one: the Argentinian mother with little son (from Imex Pilgrims set with skirt from Orion English Pirates set and feet from Caesar Modern Milita set).

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And finally all together.

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Santi Pérez  Spain
 
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Posted by Wiking on 31 Dec 2016, 07:45

Thank you for your very kind words Santi Perez.

A lot of nice conversions you have done, well documented.
So we share the same style of figure modelling. Like a (Frankenstein) doctor do.
Cut surplus arms away. Fix it to people of make it more beautiful . Swap heads to fit politic correct, into the scene. :-D
For animal I recommend you warmly stenfalk. Here at Work in Progress, animal.

One question to your Cäsar black man. You move the angle of the head.
I learned it the hard way. To bend Cäsar extremity will not work like at ESCI soft plastic.
Cäsar plastic will move back to its origin after a while. So cut it or use hot air to bring it in the chosen pose. What have you done with his head?
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Posted by Santi Pérez on 31 Dec 2016, 15:04

Thanks, Wiking. It's always good to find people to share something with, in this case conversion techniques of figures.

I usually prefer to cut and glue parts better than blending them. I don't trust they remain for ever in the chosen form and don't want to spoil a good work if they move back to the original shape after some time. This is the reason of why the black man head was cut and glued in the wished place. This ensures that it will be in the same way year after year. ;-)

By the way, I love Caesar plastic. It's the best one to be cut and carved. Very different to the latest Hät figures, with their rubbery like plastic, imposible to cut without spoiling the miniature.

Regards from Spain.

Santi.
Santi Pérez  Spain
 
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Posted by Santi Pérez on 31 Dec 2016, 18:57

This is my last post of 2016 and it’s the time for the Swiss Guards conversions.

In my initial project, the Swiss Guard force of the diorama would comprise two drummers, a Colour Party (the Sergeant Major flagbearer flanked by two NCO with two-handed sword), a Sergeant with drawn sword, four halberdiers (one Corporal with pike and three privates with halberds) and a standing Guardsman saluting, all in full dress with cuirass, except the last one and both musicians.

But, after seeing the video of the 2015 swearing in ceremony at the Vatican, I decided to replace one of the drummers by a fifer to give a wider variety.

And here you have the results of the conversions, ready for the painting work (by the way, both the drummer and the fifer were the hardest conversions in all the diorama).

The first one: the Halberdiers (from the armoured marching figure with repositioned right arm and original halberd shaft replaced by one of Hät Imperial Roman Auxiliary Infantry set).

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Next: the pike armed Corporal (the same as above, but with a converted halberd blade).

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Next: the Sergeant Major flagbearer (the same as above, but with a complete Roman spear as flagpole).

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Next: the NCO with two-handed sword (the same as above, but with a card sword added).

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Next: the Sergeant with drawn sword (the same as above, but with hand from Caesar Dismounted Crusaders set and sword blade from Hät Alexander’s Macedonian Cavalry set).

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Next: the standing Guardsman saluting (from the unarmoured standing figure with repositioned right arm).

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Next: the drummer (unarmoured figure torso with armoured figure legs, repositioned arms and drum from Zvezda Fench Imperial Guard set).

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The last one: the fifer (the same as above, but with arms and fife from Zvezda French Imperial Guard set).

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And finally all together.

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Happy end of the year to everyone.
Santi Pérez  Spain
 
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Posted by stenfalk on 31 Dec 2016, 22:19

Your conversions are very creative. It is already remarkable to have these ideas. I'm excited! :thumbup:
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Posted by Beano Boy on 31 Dec 2016, 23:29

It is good to be able to see elements of your top draw conversion work of the best quality.
Great Stuff,and most welcome. Thanks for posting. BB
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Posted by Peter on 01 Jan 2017, 20:00

That are some wonderfull conversions to make this diorama! Looking forward to the next steps! :thumbup:

PS: may I ask to stay in one topic. It has no need to open a new topic on every new step! Can work very confusing! ;-)
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Posted by Santi Pérez on 02 Jan 2017, 16:44

First of all, my best wishes for everyone in this new year.

Thank you very much for your kind comments, stenfalk, Beano Boy and Peter.

I will follow your advice, Peter, and post all the pictures of the making of under this topic. I will post in the Gallery only the pictures of the finished diorama.

Now it's the time for the first painted civilian people.

The Spanish couple.

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The black man and his Shepherd dog.

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The former Swiss Guard (without and with the Swiss flag).

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The nun.

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The Italian businesswoman with her case (from Preiser).

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The rest of the civilians in the next post.
Santi Pérez  Spain
 
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Posted by Peter on 02 Jan 2017, 16:48

Thank you Santi by following my friendly advice! :thumbup:

Now we can see the figures in close up, we see that you have a special way of painting figures. A bit cartoonish if I may say! Nothing wrong with that, because I like them very much! :thumbup:
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Posted by Emperor on 02 Jan 2017, 19:06

Very nice Santi. Every painting style is good as long as it is clean and nice done...I like your diorama ...
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Posted by Beano Boy on 02 Jan 2017, 21:16

They all look extra Cool to my eyes.
Nice doggy, with the mean looking owner. :-D BB
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Posted by Susofrick on 03 Jan 2017, 08:35

This is great! Love them!
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Posted by Santi Pérez on 04 Jan 2017, 18:53

Thank you very much for your generous words, Peter, Emperor, Beano Boy and Susofrick.

I agree with Emperor: “Every painting style is good as long as it is clean and nice done”.

I tend to be too much of a perfectionist and pay a lot of attention to detail, so it takes me a long time to paint each figure. On the other hand, I think that I usually achieve a neat finish, also due to the preparation of the figures prior to the painting work, e.g. eliminating flash and mold marks, converting, washing and priming, etc.

I usually use a white primer with large figures (15mm and larger) to get a brighter finish, while I prefer a black primer with figures up to 10mm.

I have developed my own painting style throughout forty years and I am very proud of it because it allows everyone to identify and distinguish my figures from the ones of any other painter. ;)

And here are the rest of the painted civilians.

The Argentinian father with daughter.

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The Argentinian son.

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The Argentinian mother with little son.

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All the figures together, front and back.

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Some bags and cases from Preiser to be added to the diorama.

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And finally the figures fixed to the diorama base.

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The first Swiss Guards will follow in the next post.
Santi Pérez  Spain
 
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Posted by Peter on 05 Jan 2017, 18:34

I agree with Emperor: “Every painting style is good as long as it is clean and nice done”.

And they are! My comment was not ment as critic Santi! Just a personal opinion! :-D

Looks fantastic so far! :thumbup:
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Posted by Santi Pérez on 05 Jan 2017, 20:59

My comment was not ment as critic Santi! Just a personal opinion


Don't worry, Peter. I took your comment as a personal opinion, not as a criticism against me. Thank you, all opinions are always welcome. :-D

Santi.
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Posted by Mai Strac on 05 Jan 2017, 23:31

:shock: :drool: :-D Wow FANTASTIC conversions, a great inspiration for my works, thank's for sharing!! :-P :love: :notworthy: :thumbup:
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Posted by Mr. Cryns on 06 Jan 2017, 00:08

My compliments for your creativity.
Compliments for the clear, professional and very educational way of photographing everything!
And for the painting :yeah:

Agree with Peter the painting has a cartoonesk style :-D
Agree with Emperor this cartoonesk style is very well done and its lovely.
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Posted by Das_Dirch on 06 Jan 2017, 08:38

Very nice conversions. Great ideas. The painting is very fine and clear :yeah:
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Posted by Santi Pérez on 06 Jan 2017, 18:55

Thank you for your comments, Mai Strac, Mr. Cryns and Das_Dirch.

...a great inspiration for my works...


Mai Strac, I have been taking a lot of inspiration from many people in this forum for years. It's very pleasant to know that my work can be inspiring for others too. :-D

...professional and very educational way of photographing everything!


Mr. Cryns, when you're a High School teacher, as I am, you're used to present everything in the best way you can to capture and maintain the interest of your students. ;-)

Now it's the turn of the first painted Swiss Guards.

The halberdiers (three of this type).

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The pike armed Corporal.

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The Sergeant Major flagbearer (without and with the flag added).

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The NCO with two-handed sword (two of this type).

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The rest of the Swiss Guards in the next post. ;-)
Santi Pérez  Spain
 
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Posted by Peter on 06 Jan 2017, 19:15

Congrats on how you painted the uniforms! I did an attempt in 2015 but it wasn't a very good one! ;-)

You can see it here! :-D
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