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Animals

Posted by dirk on 26 Jun 2017, 11:02

Beautiful proportions of female cattle.

I did not know that the females were much smaller !
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Posted by Mr. Cryns on 27 Jun 2017, 10:14

Stenfalk what a great animal again.
The look in her eyes: very good already and its not even painted yet.

There is something very special with your work: its sculpting looks so much different from other sculpts at our forum. Like you work with a needle. Probably you do to create the fur skins. Also your very graphic use of white putty and black paint on it gives an unusual, very strong effect. I love it a lot.

But what putty do you use? I think I asked you before but one year later now I ask you again. Is it white or grey?
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Posted by Susofrick on 27 Jun 2017, 11:35

Torsten, Torsten, Torsten! Where can we buy them??? I have your shepheards and they are being treated right now, but the rest???
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Posted by stenfalk on 28 Jun 2017, 13:19

Many thanks for the friendly and encouraging words. I don't make my sculpting dependent on it, but it would be a lie if i would say that does not motivate me.

Posted by Mr. Cryns on 27 Jun 2017, 10:14

There is something very special with your work: its sculpting looks so much different from other sculpts at our forum. Like you work with a needle. Probably you do to create the fur skins. Also your very graphic use of white putty and black paint on it gives an unusual, very strong effect. I love it a lot.

But what putty do you use? I think I asked you before but one year later now I ask you again. Is it white or grey?


The auerochs cow is actually the first figure, which I have modeled completely with MS white and white polystyren profiles for the horns. In addition, the legs are built over a brass wire. Then only was applied dilute oilcolor. This makes it easier for me to assess the relief and surface quality.

I sculpt today but also differently as in the first days. I have much more experience with the individual clays and the necessary techniques. So i create many parts today by sculpting which i have formerly carved from plastic or resin.

What materials i use for that depends on what requirements they have to fulfill. Sometimes i change an animal also in the construction phase, because i decide in the short term to give a different attitude. then i must sawing, insert and reconnect. Then also the building material at these places changes. If it's to be strongly adhered, because the attachment surface is very small, for exemple at ears or lower jaws at an open mouth, i use GS, also for gluing parts. If i know that the part later still needs to be cut with the scalpel, GS is also recommended. The modeling of all other parts is generally done with MS (currently white, grey or flesh) or Andrea Sculpt (brown). In order to protect certain parts during subsequent work, I solidify these modeling compounds after curing with a thin application of liquid superglue. This allows the surface to harden easily and is harder to cut or to grind.

The fact that some of my animals appear overall gray is due to the fact that sometimes i use a primer when the figure looks too colorful due to different materials. So i can spot flaw at the surfaces. But i do not always do that...

Posted by Susofrick on 27 Jun 2017, 11:35

Torsten, Torsten, Torsten! Where can we buy them??? I have your shepheards and they are being treated right now, but the rest???


I promise that the offer of animals will steadily increase. But i have to proceed slowly and considered. But already in the next days more sets will follow, as next larger dogs and then the Highlander cattle. The preparations are almost finished.
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stenfalk  Germany

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Posted by Mr. Cryns on 30 Jun 2017, 10:14

Dear Stenfalk,

Thank you so much for your detailed answer. I appreciate that very much. These technical breakdowns concerning the 1:72 scale model making are among the most valuable posts for me in this Forum. :-D

stenfalk wrote:i create many parts today by sculpting which i have formerly carved from plastic or resin.


Oh yes now I remember, you carved a lot in the past, that surprised me already by then. I still would love to see a WIP reportage of how all those different parts were assembled but I am probably too late now because you switched to rather traditional sculpting methods by now.

stenfalk wrote:i use GS, also for gluing parts.

Because GS is a better adhesive than, for instance, superglue?

stenfalk wrote:If i know that the part later still needs to be cut with the scalpel, GS is also recommended.

I don't understand this one: GS can be cut but not scraped with a scalpel.
MS can both be cut and scraped. Or is it because MS will crumble more easy when cutting it?

stenfalk wrote: I solidify these modeling compounds after curing with a thin application of liquid superglue.

Very good idea. Doesn't this affect shape an size of the finished parts?

stenfalk wrote:sometimes i use a primer

How about the molding? Is there still priming paint on your model or do you remove it before sending it to the factory?
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Posted by DickerThomas on 30 Jun 2017, 13:18

Great work again, Torsten ... :thumbup: :thumbup: :drool: :drool:
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Posted by stenfalk on 30 Jun 2017, 20:22

Thomas, thank you for your praise, and Mr. Cryns, thank you for your kindness, your interest and your curiosity! :yeah:

So, i will try to answer the questions.

Mr. Cryns wrote:

Because GS is a better adhesive than, for instance, superglue?


Well, i believe, superglue is an excellent medium if the adhesive surfaces have direct contact and are sufficiently dimensioned. And, not to forget, a sufficient pressure can be applied. But it happens for example, parts must be connected with a little distance. Then i usually put a metal wire with superglue and build a "bridge" over the empty space between the parts with GS. So i have the effect glue as well as volume. This is which was meant with the use of GS as an adhesive. If you can use enough GS, it is even possible to omit the wire. But this is not a recommendation, with wire is always better! ;-)

Mr. Cryns wrote:

I don't understand this one: GS can be cut but not scraped with a scalpel.
MS can both be cut and scraped. Or is it because MS will crumble more easy when cutting it?


You describe it just right. According to my experience, MS tends to fragmentation during cutting. This is sometimes not disturbing, especially if the areas can possibly also grind well. But sometimes it bothers. In doubt and when i think i need to cut i use GS. I do not know exactly what you describe, if you write, GS could not be scraped. You mean not grind, do you? I guess i work without this scraping technique, otherwise i perhaps would have noticed this too. :oops:

Generally i admit i work much less frequently with GS compared to MS.

Mr. Cryns wrote:

Very good idea. Doesn't this affect shape an size of the finished parts?


According to my experience, the liquid superglue does not add an additional volume. It seems rather that it will absorbed into the MS and sealed the surface. It's like a thin protective layer, not dissimilar to glazed ceramics. But it's only my experience. However, there is no reason to don't try it out. Maybe it's helpful. :eh:

Mr. Cryns wrote:

How about the molding? Is there still priming paint on your model or do you remove it before sending it to the factory?


Before i give masters to moulding and casting (whether primed or not), the entire surface is extensively cleaned and polished, with grinding pads of the grain 2000 and 3000 and finally with the foam backside. All what according to this procedure afterwards still adheres on the master, evidently does not go down during the molding. In any case the foundry has never complained so far... :oops:
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Posted by stenfalk on 30 Jun 2017, 20:49

As a supplement to the Highlander fold is planned there are still three lying animals to follow. Here is the first cow. The horns are made extra and later enclosed on each set or, as the case may be, individual figurine. So the user has more options for the design. That is why they are not modeled here.

Image

Versatile useable, i think... ;-)
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Posted by Kostis Ornerakis on 01 Jul 2017, 02:16

Absolutely wonderful! :love: :love: :love:
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Posted by stenfalk on 08 Jul 2017, 19:16

Today i want present to you a new work for the friends and lovers of the time of the Roman empire. In particular, it is concerned with depictions of old cattle breeds, which can be suitable for historical representations of this era. My intention is to create figurines of animals that come as close as possible to their origins in real life and in the relevant temporal context. Little by little and in ever changing themes. In the present case, i wanted to resurrect one of the "Great cattle of the Romans" like to can be seen in the following pics. Shown are details of “The Sacrifice of a Bull to the God Mars,” a relief from the altar of Domitius Aenobarbus (Roman, approx. 100 BC, marble), today displayed in the Louvre.

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In fact, different breeds are more or less conceivable. That's why it's planned to sculpt several of the imaginable animals. But I do not want to tell you more yet. For the beginning, i chose a Podolica bull, simply because i like the colors of the gray cattle. It was formerly distributed throughout most of mainland Italy and as far as Istria, now part of Croatia.
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Posted by stenfalk on 08 Jul 2017, 19:18

The Podolica cattle breed has ancient origins and is still farmed today in the southern Apennines, from Campania to Puglia to the hills of Calabria. It's a hardy breed, easily adapting to steep terrain, it manages to graze where other breeds find it difficult, eating Mediterranean scrub, bushes, stubble, and undergrowth foliage. In the past it was primarily used as a work animal and only secondarily for its meat and milk.

The origins of the Podolica breed aren't known exactely. An older theory based on the zoological theories of the nineteenth century, suggested this breed derives from cattle brought to Italy by invaders coming from the Podolian steppes in the 5th or 6th century AD. But this hypothesis isn't supported by the modern genetic, zoological or archaeological research. DNA has shown that Italian and Balkan cattle differ in haplogroup distribution indicating that the maternal lineages are still of local descent and that the Podolica-gene flow into Italy as far back as the first century BC.

It fits, the remains of the earliest European farms suggest two routes of domesticated cattle migration: via the Mediterranean coasts and along the Danube river. So, in Greece during the Hellenistic period (ca. 330–63 BC), cattle were used for traction, sacrifice, beef production and also milking. According to Aristotle, the rich pasturelands of Epirus were famous for the large size of their livestock. These Epirote cattle were exported to several regions in Italy and southern France. In Italy, these cattle were probably the ancestors of the large Roman cattle and artistic representations from this era shows a type of the Roman cattle phenotypically resemble the Podolica. In addition, paleontological evidence indicates that cattle in various parts of the Roman Empire varied widely in size. Germanic cattle stood 95–125 cm; those in the Roman provinces 100–150 cm. A survey of 20 sites showed that cows dating from the Empire averaged a withers height of 130 cm and bulls 140–150 cm. The Pax Romana and infrastructure of the Roman Empire probably facilitated export of large Italian cattle to the distant provinces, where these cattle lived in the same areas as the small indigenous cattle. Strikingly, the large cattle disappeared soon after the fall of the Roman Empire, suggesting that smaller animals fitted better to a husbandry system that had regressed to more primitive practices.

The figure thus fits for every diorama on the subject of Roman Empire and Italy from the 17th-18th century.

The colour of the Podolica shows pronounced sexual dimorphism: cows are pale grey, tending to white, while males are darker and may be almost black. As in other breeds of grey cattle, the calves are born wheat-coloured but become grey at about three months. The skin is black, as are the natural openings. The horns are light, lyre-shaped in cows, half-moon-shaped in bulls; they are slate-grey in young animals, becoming pale at the base and dark at the tip with maturity. The breed is of medium to large size and lightweight; also the skeleton is light. The average height at the withers is 130-135 cm in females, and between 150-155 cm in males; average weight for cows is 370-440 kg, and 650-750 kg for bulls.

The young, stately bull on the photos is obviously very enthusiastic about a fiery Podolica-lady, which we unfortunately cannot (yet) see here.

Image

Image

Image

Image
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Posted by Kostis Ornerakis on 08 Jul 2017, 19:32

Fantastic as always :thumbup: but I'll remain faithful to the lying Highlander. :oops: :-D
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Posted by Beano Boy on 09 Jul 2017, 13:07

I admire the Bull greatly,indeed a fine piece of work. Thanks for the extra information too.

Image

Ancient cattle for ancient dusty themes, I`m sure many of our fellow members will be interested in obtaining extra props for their own expanded thoughts and dreams of antiquity. :thumbup:

Image

Depending on how one wishes to look upon it, many things have not that much improved since those far off ancient times.Certainly some who work the land are one with nature but certainly it is a hard living to maintain.BB
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Posted by Graeme on 09 Jul 2017, 13:46

Good looking bull Torsten and I really like the aurochs. But the lying shaggy coo is what really caught my attention. Very nice!
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Posted by Carlos on 09 Jul 2017, 21:55

Excellent work!!! :notworthy: :notworthy: :notworthy:
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Posted by Mr. Cryns on 22 Jul 2017, 11:19

Stenfalk,

You knew you would steal my heart by posting such material, didn't you?
Starting with a beautiful stone bas-relief from Roman times, taking my attention at once.
Supported by some excellent background information.
And the impressive animal. I am still fascinated by your technical skills.
Remarkable front legs: they look extremely short, I read your text twice but you did not mention anything about these legs.

Also I have to thank you for taking the time to answer all of my questions on june 30th.

stenfalk wrote: I do not know exactly what you describe, if you write, GS could not be scraped. You mean not grind, do you? I guess i work without this scraping technique, otherwise i perhaps would have noticed this too.


Apologies for the confusion, my words were not correct indeed.
You are right: GS can be scraped with a sharp knife blade but grinding, filing or sanding leaves a messy result.
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Posted by stenfalk on 22 Jul 2017, 21:56

Many thanks again at all visitors of this thread for judgements, advices, hints and kind comments. :yeah:

Mr. Cryns wrote:Remarkable front legs: they look extremely short, I read your text twice but you did not mention anything about these legs.


Mr. Cryns, it is amazing that you have noticed on the photos, which also bothered me immediately. I am talking about the short legs of the bull. These came about of the following reason: For me it was clear i want to build a bull of the Podolica breed. These animals are rather light for their size, between 650-750 kg. The pic which i selected for the forming of the body, showed however a bull of the breed Romagnola, a clearly heavier variety. I have tried hard, but after the sighting of the photos, it seemed the transfer to the more delicate habitus of Podolica had not succeeded. The short right fore leg should originally come from the fact that the animal is flexed in the shoulder joint. But only at sighting the photos i noticed i had not reproduced this effect convincingly.

I just finished the conversion work today, unfortunately i've not managed to shoot new photos. This time i'm much happier, i think it's good to see why the animal keeps its body slightly lowered. I put the right front bone slightly more forward, and the muscles were more clearly shaped on the sides. Besides, i extended the neck once again.

But i don't want to describe all the worksteps in detail. I will post some photos in the next few days, I think it is good to see what I have done in detail work.
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Posted by Salaberry on 23 Jul 2017, 00:54

I'm sorry if I'm asking a question that was previously asked but are these for sale.
I can only agree with Alex: they are full of life.
And it's a dog lover and owner who tells you that.

AWESOME job: keep it up !

Sala
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Posted by Beano Boy on 23 Jul 2017, 02:46

The Picture of the German Shepard,
i like very much in your little box over your Forum handle. :-D BB
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Posted by Paul on 23 Jul 2017, 09:42

Beano Boy wrote:Image

!! The bulls !! :shock: The poor Things. Not much bigger than Dogs and forced to pull a heavy plough over the tops of the trees!! :mad: :mad:
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