Modelling

A comparison between classic dipping and contrasts

Posted by blacksmith on 20 Sep 2023, 13:50

I painted a second set of "Skavens" but this time with the dipping technique. As you can see below, there is not much difference in result when compared to the ones I have painted before, but there is a huge difference in time:

The model on the left has been primed in white and then painted with basic colours and finally dipped in varnish stained, whereas the one on the left has been primed in black and then retouched it with a brush to cover those holes where the spray doesn't reach. After that, it's been drybrushed it in pale grey and then in white, and finally painted with contrast paints. I'd say that each figure on the right took me six more times to finish it than the one on the left!

I also have to say that I made some mistakes painting the latest set and that next time they will turn out better.

In a nutshell, varnish stain dipped figures are faster and cheaper to paint and a much harder finish, but none of this methods convince me. I'm sure it would be different if I used Mixwax but it is impossible to get it in Spain, sigh!

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image
User avatar
blacksmith  Spain
 
Posts: 402
Member since:
01 Jul 2021, 10:02


Posted by steve_pickstock on 20 Sep 2023, 14:13

I have never really been a fan of dipping as such, it seems a bit to uncontrolled, as well as being messy.
I tend to use washes selectively these days, instead of just lashing them all over, I apply them where I think they can do the most benefit, and spread them about with a clean wet rush. What I do do is to either choose the matt version or add matt medium.
Once the washes are dry I go back with the original colour and touch that up, and then come back with any highlights.
I haven't really used speed paints enough to comment.
User avatar
steve_pickstock  England
 
Posts: 1323
Member since:
20 Jun 2010, 19:56

Posted by blacksmith on 21 Sep 2023, 10:36

steve_pickstock wrote:I have never really been a fan of dipping as such, it seems a bit to uncontrolled, as well as being messy.
I tend to use washes selectively these days, instead of just lashing them all over, I apply them where I think they can do the most benefit, and spread them about with a clean wet rush. What I do do is to either choose the matt version or add matt medium.
Once the washes are dry I go back with the original colour and touch that up, and then come back with any highlights.
I haven't really used speed paints enough to comment.

Well, yes. I'm doing more or less the same as you. I was just experimenting faster painting techniques but I'm not convinced so I guess I'll stick to my usual painting method. After all, it's more important to have a a few nice painted minis than a lot of awful ones.
User avatar
blacksmith  Spain
 
Posts: 402
Member since:
01 Jul 2021, 10:02

Posted by steve_pickstock on 21 Sep 2023, 11:45

Please ignore
User avatar
steve_pickstock  England
 
Posts: 1323
Member since:
20 Jun 2010, 19:56

Posted by steve_pickstock on 21 Sep 2023, 11:57

blacksmith wrote:. After all, it's more important to have a a few nice painted minis than a lot of awful ones.


Isn't that what we all aim for?

I'm not yet convinced by the "slap chop" technique. I don't think it works very well with 1:72 because the figures have less prominent detail. There isn't enough space on the figures for a zenithal highlight to provide the contrast under the contrast paints. The whole point is to use BIG instruments - rattle cans for priming and highlights, and the contrast paints for simple areas like clothing. I can see it working on big models - dinosaurs, dragons etc, but not on man-sized figures.

The base coat/wash/re-colour/highlight (it needs a seriously better name than that) works well enough for me because you're not dealing with huge expanses of colour, just small touches.
User avatar
steve_pickstock  England
 
Posts: 1323
Member since:
20 Jun 2010, 19:56

Posted by blacksmith on 22 Sep 2023, 12:57

steve_pickstock wrote:
Isn't that what we all aim for?

I'm not yet convinced by the "slap chop" technique. I don't think it works very well with 1:72 because the figures have less prominent detail. There isn't enough space on the figures for a zenithal highlight to provide the contrast under the contrast paints. The whole point is to use BIG instruments - rattle cans for priming and highlights, and the contrast paints for simple areas like clothing. I can see it working on big models - dinosaurs, dragons etc, but not on man-sized figures.

The base coat/wash/re-colour/highlight (it needs a seriously better name than that) works well enough for me because you're not dealing with huge expanses of colour, just small touches.


I agree with you 110%.
User avatar
blacksmith  Spain
 
Posts: 402
Member since:
01 Jul 2021, 10:02

Help keep the forum online!
or become a supporting member


Return to Modelling