Modelling

How to use baking soda and super glue?

Posted by Peter on 31 Oct 2021, 10:08

What is the best way to work with those two components?

Does it burns to on the figures, like it did on Steve Pickstock?

Does the plastic melt?

Does it do the trick also for metal things?

I would like to know because I have a lot of figures without a base.

Can someone do a step by step for me, possibly with some pictures?

Thank you.
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by steve_pickstock on 31 Oct 2021, 14:25

It doesn't burn onto the figures. In my case it was on bare skin which got very warm very quickly, figures appear to take it okay. I assume that is because the reaction isn't hot enough to melt them.

What is it you're trying to do?
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Posted by Xantippos on 31 Oct 2021, 15:22

Never heard about it. Just googled it and says it will speed up drying time.

Be careful however with exothermic reactions; some acrylic fabrics react with superglue. I was once gluing a sort of fabric from a bag, and my fingers were burnt! nothing too serious, but it will scorch for a day or two. Other fabric rubbers too generate a very hot exothermic reaction, enough to make vapour!
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Posted by PaulRPetri on 01 Nov 2021, 00:24

Well Peter in my experience it glues plastics and metals very well. I use very thin super glue. I put glue on both parts hold them together like you normally would I then drizzle backing soda on the glue. It sets up immediately. I did glue some trees by dipping the bottom in water, then dipped the end into the baking soda put glue on the base then stuck the tree onto that. Worked perfectly. Was dry instantly. I have seen videos of guys using baking soda and super glue to terrain individual bases. Creates the base which is then painted. I will try to locate that.
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Posted by PaulRPetri on 01 Nov 2021, 00:28

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Posted by Kostis Ornerakis on 01 Nov 2021, 01:08

I use the combination to fill in the gaps.
The super glue by itself works extremely well, if the 2 surfaces to be glued fit together perfectly.
In other cases (if we have gaps) we use super glue and sprinkle baking soda on top. We might repeat the procedure more than once.
It does not affect plastic and is suitable for metals. We can use sandpaper for the excess material.
Finally, we can use any powder. E.g. powder from rubbing the model itself. :-D
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Kostis Ornerakis  Greece
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Posted by Bluefalchion on 01 Nov 2021, 03:44

I put glue on each side of the part to be glued. Put the baking soda in a tiny dish. Dip one part into the powder, then press together.

Hold tightly for a few seconds, and voila.
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Posted by MABO on 13 Nov 2021, 09:42

Sorry ,Peter, no experience, yet. What do you want to build with it?

I know I am late for this topic... :oops:
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Posted by Peter on 13 Nov 2021, 09:55

MABO wrote:Sorry ,Peter, no experience, yet. What do you want to build with it?

I know I am late for this topic... :oops:

I have a lot of unbased figures from a second hand auction and I'm looking for a way to glue them decent on a diorama or something else. I'm not so happy with the result with only using super glue.

And for metal things I have the same problem. I tried with super glue and water but it isn't strong enough.

Soon I will do some test with baking soda and super glue and see what it gives.

Stay tuned! ;-)
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by MABO on 13 Nov 2021, 10:25

Peter wrote:Stay tuned! ;-)


I will! ;-) ;-)
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Posted by Kostis Ornerakis on 13 Nov 2021, 10:46

Hello Peter,
I suggest 2 other possible solutions.
With both, first use a drop of super glue and hold until your figurine does not fall. Next, reinforce the joint with either 2-component epoxy glue or diluted white glue and earth materials. :-D
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Posted by Peter on 13 Nov 2021, 13:47

Thanks Kostis! :thumbup:
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by steve_pickstock on 16 Nov 2021, 15:00

Peter wrote:I have a lot of unbased figures from a second hand auction and I'm looking for a way to glue them decent on a diorama or something else. I'm not so happy with the result with only using super glue.

And for metal things I have the same problem. I tried with super glue and water but it isn't strong enough.

Soon I will do some test with baking soda and super glue and see what it gives.

Stay tuned! ;-)

I think it all depends on the amount of room you have in the diorama, on how I would do it.
Primarily I would consider drilling and the inserting a pin to the figure, then drill the diorama and then glue the figures down, perhaps a sprinkle of baking soda while the supergue is still wet.
If I were glueing the figures to bases I would use a white glue - EVO stick or UHU first to get them attatched to the base. Once that is set, then apply a liberal coat of superglue around the surface of the base, up against the figures base and over-lapping it, and then apply the baking powder. This would blend the figure with the base and grip like crazy.
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Posted by Peter on 16 Nov 2021, 22:27

Another good option Steve. Thanks! :thumbup:
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Posted by PaulRPetri on 17 Nov 2021, 16:05

Peter if you go with the super glue backing soda option on a finished diorama you can end up with white backing soda in places you don't want it. What I did to lessen that, when mounting some trees onto a finished gaming base I dipped the bottom of the tree into some water to get it wet then dipped that into backing soda. I then put the super glue on the finished ground area that I wanted the tree. I then pressed the tree into the glue spot and it set up in just a second or two. It will leave a white blob on the bottom of the tree were it meets the ground, the chemical reaction result. So you will have to terrain over that. Just some options to think over. Good luck.
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Posted by PaulRPetri on 17 Nov 2021, 16:07

Just to show an example all the round bases in my Market Garden war-game were done in the way I described above.
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Posted by Peter on 17 Nov 2021, 16:55

I keep it in mind, Paul, when I do a test. I will use some Hong Kong figures I think for it, so when it goes wrong it isn't a big loss. ;-) ;-) :thumbup:
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