Modelling

helpful photograph of La Haye Sainti

Posted by Beano Boy on 24 Nov 2020, 14:45

Image

It still stands in the middle of a very changed landscape where once the Great Waterloo Battle was waged in all its suddenness.It the picture i found years ago,being Just a hint and a glimmer of what La Haye Sainte Farm and roadway looked like in the years leading up to the 1960's. Now it is as it is. Floating in a slopping sea of utter blinking flatness! Blink and you'll miss it upon that modern highway of zoom.

i must say that i did not now where to place this picture,for i indeed have no more plans floating in my head of dreams to build it again,but i guess it is most fitting here lost in a void of whiteness like the metaphor its surroundings have become.

:coffee: Stay safe,Stay well for we are all far flung friends.BB
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Posted by Harry Faversham on 25 Nov 2020, 11:57

Looks a lot nicer back then though, doesn't it?

:yeah:
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Harry Faversham  England
 
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Posted by Kekso on 25 Nov 2020, 12:49

Why am I under impression that there were much less trees back in 1815.? :eh:
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Kekso  Croatia

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Posted by C M Dodson on 25 Nov 2020, 13:57

Hello Mr B.

This is a very nice picture but I am not sure about it’s authenticity, certainly for the 1960’s.

This aerial view was taken in 1967 by Jac Weller for his Wellington at Waterloo book.

Image

The landscape is very much as it is today, even allowing for the time of year.

The electric railway line is clearly visible to the left.

The building seems to have the plaques including the diamond shaped KGL memorial, replaced in 1847.

I wondered if this was possibly a postcard picture that was coloured in of the sort popular at the turn of the Century?

However, this picture taken at the turn of the century showing the extension of the line, to transport crowds to the fallen eagle monument in June 1904, does also provide evidence of recent tree planting.

Image

Perhaps it’s a mid 20th Century picture?

Fascinating stuff.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by Harry Faversham on 25 Nov 2020, 17:11

It's a lovely image, whether tickled up or not. This one's allegedly from the 60s...

Image

:yeah:
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Harry Faversham  England
 
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Posted by C M Dodson on 25 Nov 2020, 17:43

Hello Mr F.

Yes it’s a nice picture but apart from an updated road and a courtyard full of foliage I believe it’s the same basic picture as the big trees have not changed in shape or size.

The car looks very modern too.

The original road was Flemish pave with sand walkways for the horses. The first picture looks a bit dodgy to me.

Nonetheless, all good stuff.

Best wishes,

Chris
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Posted by Peter on 26 Nov 2020, 16:19

Here are some pictures I made from the ferm in 2016:

Image

Image

Image

Image
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Flambeau on 29 Nov 2020, 12:54

Hi,

there's a drawing of La Haye Sainte by Denis Dighton, which was made shortly after the battle. You can find this one and others here:

https://augusta-stylianou.pixels.com/fe ... ghton.html

(can't insert the picture itself for some reason). Hope this helps.
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Posted by Peter on 29 Nov 2020, 13:20

This one?

Image
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Flambeau on 29 Nov 2020, 17:12

Exactly, thanks for posting Peter!

By 1814 Dighton "had received the title of Military Painter to H.R.H. the Prince Regent. The prince sent Dighton to the Southern Netherlands just before the Battle of Waterloo, and seems to have bought all his exhibited pictures. Dighton visited the Waterloo battlefield five days after the victory and executed nine paintings of the battle."

So, I think we may assume these are pretty accurate. Not so many trees to be seen here, but perhaps some fell victim to artillery fire and soldiers looking for firewood after a wet night.

These might also be interesting:
https://www.fineartstorehouse.com/hulto ... 53661.html
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/articl ... oleon.html
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Posted by Kekso on 04 Dec 2020, 13:13

Flambeau wrote:Hi, there's a drawing of La Haye Sainte by Denis Dighton, which was made shortly after the battle.


Peter wrote:This one?


Well, it seems that scavengers took everything very quickly :xd:
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Kekso  Croatia

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