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Painting Caeser WWII Miniatures

Posted by Bluefalchion on 23 Dec 2010, 17:34

Hi all. This has not happened to me before, and I would appreciate some input. I Picked up a Panzer Grenadiers 2 set from Caesar Miniatures, my first set from that company. Tried to paint them with Testors Model Masters enamel paints. At first, I painted a couple of guys right out of the box after a quick soap wash. Over one month later, they are still not dry. I then soaked the rest in soapy water for a whole day, rinsed them off, let them thoroughly air dry, then applied a thinner coat. The Sand color seems to be drying, but it might just be my imagination. The flat tan color looks super glossy (not the look I am shooting for) and is also still sticky to the touch after at least a week of drying. I know some of Van Gogh's paintings are still drying, as well, but I don't really want to wait 160 years to finish these figs. I am using the same exact paints and techniques on my Revell and Italeri figures, and they are drying just fine in a few short minutes.

I am hoping the answer is not that I need an entire new set of acrylic paints. Anyone have suggestions, advice or experience to share?
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Bluefalchion  United States of America
 
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Posted by Maurice on 23 Dec 2010, 18:29

I am hoping the answer is not that I need an entire new set of acrylic paints.

Well, that is the answer you will get, these new soft plastics (HaT, Caesar, Orion) are developed to take acrylics better but they are crap when it comes to enamels.

Besides, I don't know where you are from, but if you are from the EU, you will have to change to acrylics anyway, as enamels will soon be banned from the EU all together.
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Posted by ModernKiwi on 23 Dec 2010, 18:54

I have had the same thing happen with my Caesar figures and enamels (and with Pegasus figures too).

The trick I have found is to undercoat the figures with an acrylic paint. I use an acrylic gesso, but pretty much any such should work.
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ModernKiwi  New Zealand
 
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Posted by Paul on 23 Dec 2010, 18:56

I am hoping the answer is not that I need an entire new set of acrylic paints.

Maurice wrote:Well, that is the answer you will get, these new soft plastics (HaT, Caesar, Orion) are developed to take acrylics better but they are crap when it comes to enamels.

Besides, I don't know where you are from, but if you are from the EU, you will have to change to acrylics anyway, as enamels will soon be banned from the EU all together.


Even with acrylics sometimes it´s like trying tp piant on vaseline, even after a five spin cycle at 1000°C in the washing machine.
Good news about the enamels.....for the enviroment that is :headbang:



Hold on!!!!! ALL enamels!!! What about my nail varnish??
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Paul  China

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Posted by musketier on 23 Dec 2010, 19:23

I would try what KiWi said about the Gesso, but unfortunately Acrylics will be what you need in the future.
@Paul 1,000C eh? hmmmm painting plastic blobs again are we, and btw I think you'll need a new type nail varnish soon :lol:
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musketier  United States of America
 
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Posted by Bluefalchion on 23 Dec 2010, 19:29

Thanks a lot for the responses, guys. I was flummoxed, but it is nice to know others have had the same issues. I will try the acrylic gesso undercoat.

Luckily, in the USA, we don't believe in the environment. At least, our leaders don't. So enamels are going to be good to go for years to come here! Do acrylics have a longer shelf life? And do you really just wash your brush off between colors with...water?
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Bluefalchion  United States of America
 
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Posted by musketier on 23 Dec 2010, 21:36

yes, water clean up is a snap between colors, I use acetone at the end of the session to clean the brush out real good, especially at the base of the brush. Much more pleasant than dealing with the smell of the enamel paint and pain thinner :-D
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musketier  United States of America
 
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Posted by Peter on 23 Dec 2010, 22:21

Paul wrote:Hold on!!!!! ALL enamels!!! What about my nail varnish??

The acrylics will do also very well Paul. Today I had GW Tin Bitz on my nails, and I felt so good when I saw them shining :love:

Welcome again bluefalchion. Two years ago I also was a enamel painter, but now I only use acrylics to paint. What more as two years on this forum can do with people ;-)
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Bluefalchion on 24 Dec 2010, 00:21

The thought of painting with acrylics makes my head get dizzy, my knees a little wobbly, and my stomach drop like being on a roller coaster. A bit like a goblin in sunshine, at least according to 'The Hobbit.' But, what the heck? I will try it. Thanks for the welcoming words.
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Bluefalchion  United States of America
 
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Posted by Peter on 24 Dec 2010, 09:43

Bluefalchion wrote:The thought of painting with acrylics makes my head get dizzy, my knees a little wobbly, and my stomach drop like being on a roller coaster. A bit like a goblin in sunshine, at least according to 'The Hobbit.' But, what the heck? I will try it. Thanks for the welcoming words.

That were the right words my friend, otherwise some of the guys would have been torchering you :mrgreen: :lol: :joker:
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Paul on 24 Dec 2010, 11:34

Bluefalchion wrote: Do acrylics have a longer shelf life? And do you really just wash your brush off between colors with...water?

Yes and yes....I use two pots of water..one with just clear water and one with a bit of washing up liquid....first basic clean in the water without, then with water with and then water without.....easy..no smells or fumes. I don´t know how anyone gets along with enamel based paint...all that cleaning with expensive enviromentally unfriendly chemicals.
I mean....to get a really fine point on my brushes (after they are clean) I put them in my mouth and using a twisting and light pulling action pull them through my lips....would that be ok with brushes dipped in enamels etc...?


And welcome to the forum Bluefalchion :-)
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Paul  China

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Posted by ModernKiwi on 24 Dec 2010, 11:55

Well I am still using a mixture of enamels and acrylics, so I have a pot of water and one of turpentine on my desk. When I clean a brush that has been in enamel, I first clean it in turps, then dry it before cleaning it again in water. That way I can do the mouth trick (no not that one Paul) too.
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ModernKiwi  New Zealand
 
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Posted by Paul on 24 Dec 2010, 12:12

Do lots of people do that then...the trick with sticking the brushes in the mouth to get a fine piont...?
I assumed I was being a bit....er?....strange by doing it.
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Paul  China

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Posted by Maurice on 24 Dec 2010, 12:28

That's so old, even Rembrandt stuck his brush in his mouth to get a fine point ;)
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Posted by Benno on 24 Dec 2010, 13:06

I've never put the brush in my mouth after painting. I put the point in water and dry it in kitchen towel (keukenpapier). I hold the point through the kitchen towel while I make a rotating movement with the brush while I slide it back from between my fingers. Has worked for me for years now. :-)
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Benno  Netherlands

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Posted by Peter on 24 Dec 2010, 13:09

:vomit:

Just some spit on the fingers and turn it around. That's good enough for me ;-)

@Paul: first your nails and now your lips :eh: What would people think about you? :laughing:
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Peter  Belgium

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Posted by Maurice on 24 Dec 2010, 13:48

Peter wrote: :vomit:

You're supposed to wash the paint off in some water first Peter ;)
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Posted by Peter on 24 Dec 2010, 14:08

Peter wrote: :vomit:


Maurice wrote:You're supposed to wash the paint off in some water first Peter ;)

:think: Now I know how it comes that I use so much brushes. You can clean them in water. Never thought about that :laughing:
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Posted by Bluefalchion on 27 Dec 2010, 02:00

I love this forum! Next question: what color or technique do you use for the metal gas mask canisters that so many of the soldiers carry? The HaT guide says to paint them flat OD green (1164), and I did, but it looks terrible. Possibly it is a wear and tear issue, and they were initially issued in that color? The flat green looks too bright, totally unrealistic, and nothing like any of the photos or illustrations I have seen. Most of the other HaT guide recommendations are spot on, however. Any advice?
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Bluefalchion  United States of America
 
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Posted by musketier on 27 Dec 2010, 02:55

try putting a black wash on the gas canister that should give more definition and dull the OD green a bit and make the ridges pop out to the eye.
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